The Future of Aquaculture and Its Role in the Global Food System Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/sn00b074m

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

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  • There are only three fundamental sources for increasing seafood supply:  1) better management and utilization of wild fish stocks, 2) aquaculture and 3) aquaculture-enhanced ‘wild’ fisheries.  However, nearly all of the significant growth in global seafood harvest and international trade over the past three decades has, and in the future will, come from aquaculture.  This has important implications for business, resource management, international trade and global food security.   This is compounded by the scale and dynamics of emerging economies such as China and India. Aquaculture has had annual growth rates of over 7 percent in recent decades, it accounts for more than half of seafood supply and recently it passed the global production of beef. Despite this growth, the potential for added growth and improved efficiency in the aquaculture is still tremendous. As the aquaculture industry grows, uncertainty in quantity and price will likely decline relative to the traditional fishery sector.   This will help aquaculture secure market share from traditional fisheries and other animal proteins. However, governance aquatic resources and disease management are undermining the development of the aquaculture sector in many regions. Nations that address these issues will enhance aquaculture’s contribution to food security, its competiveness and its sustainability.
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  • 0976343290

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