Conference Proceedings Or Journal

 

Cross Cultural Differences in Fish Consumption: The SEAFOODplus Consumer Survey in Five European Countries Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/w0892c113

Research Paper

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • The objective of this paper is to explore eating and shopping habits related to fish across five European countries. A cross sectional consumer survey was carried out in Belgium, Denmark, Netherlands, Poland, and Spain. A total sample of 4800 consumers was obtained, and the sample was representative within each country for age and region. This study uses descriptive statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and post hoc multiple comparison analysis (Scheffe's) to compare differences between countries. First, a cross-culture overview of fish consumption is given. The average weekly consumption of fish across countries was 1.5 times a week. Spain had by far the highest frequency of fish consumption with almost three times a week, followed by Denmark with 1.4 times a week. The consumption of fish was lowest in the Netherlands. On average, about 80 % of all fish meals were consumed at home. While consumers in Denmark only ate 6 % of their fish outside their homes, this frequency was 31 % in Poland. As expected, the consumption of different product types (e.g., fresh, frozen, ready to eat, canned) or species (e.g., cod, salmon, mackerel, hake) differed a lot across the different countries. This study also reports consumption frequency for wild versus farmed fish. However, it seems that many consumers are not aware if the fish they buy are wild or farmed. Secondly, this study also investigated similarities and differences in shopping habits. Supermarkets and fishmongers were the most often used outlets for purchasing fish across countries. As expected, Spain had the highest frequency of purchasing fish at all types of outlets, except for purchasing directly from the fisherman and own catches, which were highest in Poland. Third, an ANOVA analysis was conducted across countries for most central consumption variables in order to explain differences based on demographic variables such as age, number of children in the household, income and gender.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Honkanen, Pirjo, Kjell Toften, Svein Ottar Olsen, Zuzanna Pieniak, Wim Verbeke, Karen Brunso and Joachim Scholderer. 2006. Cross Cultural Differences in Fish Consumption: The SEAFOODplus Consumer Survey in Five European Countries. In: Proceedings of the Thirteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics & Trade, July 11-14, 2006, Portsmouth, UK: Rebuilding Fisheries in an Uncertain Environment. Compiled by Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics & Trade, Corvallis, Oregon, USA, 2006. CD ROM. ISBN 0-9763432-3-1
Conference Name
Subject
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
  • The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration Marine Fisheries Service, United States Department of Commerce (NOAA Fisheries); United Kingdom Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA); The United States Agency for International Development supported Aquaculture Collaborative Research and Support Program (ACRSP).
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-10-31T16:26:12Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 329.pdf: 128940 bytes, checksum: 2208732013d16563c72d39f78e4a4667 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2006-11
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Brian E. Davis(brian.davis@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-10-31T16:26:12Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 329.pdf: 128940 bytes, checksum: 2208732013d16563c72d39f78e4a4667 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Katy Davis (kdscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-10-30T21:58:50Z No. of bitstreams: 1 329.pdf: 128940 bytes, checksum: 2208732013d16563c72d39f78e4a4667 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items