Prospects for Improving value Chain of aquaculture fish (Tilapia and African Catfish) in Central Uganda Public Deposited

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Abstract Only. This is part of the IIFET Special Session on Markets and Value Chains for Small Aquaculture & Fisheries Enterprises with a Focus on Gender that took place on 17 July 2012 in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania in conjunction with 16th IIFET Conference. The complete proceedings of this special session are available ( http://aquafishcrsp.oregonstate.edu/Documents/Uploads/FileManager/IIFET%202012%20CRSP%20Session%20Proceedings%20Final_small.pdf) through the Aquaculture & Fisheries Collaborative Research Support Program gender web site, ( http://aquafishcrsp.oregonstate.edu/Gender/).

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  • The paper examines the value chain of cultured fish (Tilapia and African catfish) in central Uganda with an objective of providing information on the topic. Aquaculture has been recognized as a sector to contribute to food security and poverty alleviation in the country. However, there is dearth of information on this sector. Data collected through a structured questionnaire in 2010 was designed to solicit information along the value chain from farmers to the consumer including all the key players. In addition to structured questionnaires, case studies were also undertaken. The results show that the cultured fish value chain is short. Much of the fish grown by farmers is sold at the pond site due to limited volumes produced for sale, the demand for fish is quite high and at the same time the market for large volumes of the product is underdeveloped. Little value addition is undertaken due to limited knowledge. However, two case studies of private sector initiatives on marketing farmed fish undertaken by Kajjansi Aquaculture Research and Development Centre suggest that trading in cultured fish is profitable. Smoking fish, particularly catfish in attempt to improve its taste and hence acceptability by consumers is beneficial. A survey of traders and processors dealing in captured fish cited lack of demand for cultured fish products because of the size and reliability of supply as the major constraints to carrying the products in their stalls. There is need to develop production and value chain capacities to respond to the existing high demand.
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  • Hyuha, T. & Atukunda, G. Prospects for Improving value Chain of aquaculture fish (Tilapia and African Catfish) in Central Uganda. In: Visible Possibilities: The Economics of Sustainable Fisheries, Aquaculture and Seafood Trade: Proceedings of the Sixteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 16-20, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Edited by Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2012.
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