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Daily Snowpack Fate Data Supporting New Metrics for Snow in a Warming Climate: Indicators for the National Climate Assessment Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/datasets/bc386q457

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  • Snowpack impacts and trends in precipitation regimes are investigated for the mountainous western United States from water years 1984–2016. The vast majority of snow trend studies utilize undifferentiated air temperature records, which do not segregate between days with and without precipitation and effectually dilute temperature trends relevant for snowpack monitoring. In this work, 33 years of daily meteorological data from 567 Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) sites and a homogenized daily temperature dataset were used to investigate the temporal evolution of storm day temperatures, frequency, and effective snowfall and snowmelt. Temperature records were sourced from the Topographic Weather (TopoWx) dataset, which contains gridded daily minimum and maximum air temperatures for the contiguous United States, at an 800-meter resolution (Oyler et al., 2015). Homogenization of the data is described in Oyler et al. (2014). Daily average temperatures were computed as the mean of daily minimum and daily maximum temperatures. Daily values of minimum, average and maximum temperatures for each SNOTEL site were extracted using the nearest grid cell, identified by site coordinates. Keywords: Snow Water Equivalent; Snowpack; Temperature measurements; West (U.S.); Mountains
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  • Hu, J. M. (2018). Daily Snowpack Fate Data Supporting New Metrics for Snow in a Warming Climate: Indicators for the National Climate Assessment (Version 1) [Data set]. Oregon State University. https://doi.org/10.7267/BC386Q457
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  • This work was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant #NNX16AG35G.
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