Lidar-derived canopy architecture predicts brown creeper occupancy of two western coniferous forests Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/02870w37z

This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by The Cooper Ornithological Society and can be found at:  http://www.cooper.org/.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • In western conifer-dominated forests where the abundance of old-growth stands is decreasing, species such as the Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) may be useful as indicator species for monitoring the health of old-growth systems because they are strongly associated with habitat characteristics associated with old growth and are especially sensitive to forest management. Light detection and ranging (lidar) is useful for acquiring fine-resolution, three-dimensional data on vegetation structure across broad areas. We evaluated Brown Creeper occupancy of forested landscapes by using lidar-derived canopy metrics in two coniferous forests in Idaho. Density of the upper canopy was the most important variable for predicting Brown Creeper occupancy, although mean height and height variability were also included in the top models. The upper canopy was twice as dense and the mean height was almost 50% higher at occupied than at unoccupied sites. Previous studies have found indicators of canopy density to be important factors for Brown Creeper habitat; however, this represents the first time that lidar data have been used to examine this relationship empirically through the mapping of the upper canopy density that cannot be continuously quantified by field-based methods or passive remote sensing. Our model’s performance was classified as “good” by multiple criteria. We were able to map probabilities of Brown Creeper occupancy in ~50 000 ha of forest, probabilities that can be used at the local, forest-stand, and landscape scales, and illustrate the potential utility of lidar-derived data for studies of avian distributions in forested landscapes.
  • En los bosques dominados por coníferas del oeste, donde está disminuyendo la abundancia de rodales maduros, las especies como Certhia americana pueden ser útiles como especies indicadoras para monitorear la salud de los sistemas maduros debido a que están fuertemente asociadas con las características del hábitat vinculadas con el bosque maduro y son especialmente sensibles al manejo del bosque. El sistema de detección y alcance de luz (denominado lidar, un acrónimo del inglés “light detection and ranging”) es útil para adquirir datos tridimensionales de alta resolución de la estructura de la vegetación a través de grandes áreas. Evaluamos la ocupación de C. americana de paisajes boscosos usando métricas del dosel derivadas de lidar en dos bosques de coníferas en Idaho. La densidad del dosel alto fue la variable más importante para predecir la ocupación de C. americana, aunque la altura media y la variabilidad de la altura también fueron incluidas en los mejores modelos. El dosel alto fue dos veces más denso y la altura media fue casi 50% más alta en los sitios ocupados que en los sitios desocupados. Estudios previos han encontrado que los indicadores de densidad del dosel son factores importantes del hábitat de C. americana; sin embargo, esto representa la primera vez que datos de lidar han sido usados para examinar esta relación de modo empírico a través del mapeo de la densidad del dosel alto, de un modo continuo que no puede ser cuantificado por métodos basados en trabajo de campo o muestreo remoto pasivo. El desempeño de nuestro modelo fue clasificado como “bueno” por múltiples criterios. Fuimos capaces de mapear las probabilidades de ocupación de C. americana en ~50 000 ha de bosque, probabilidades que pueden ser usadas a las escalas local, de rodal de bosque y de paisaje, y que ilustran la utilidad potencial de los datos derivados de lidar para estudios de distribución de aves en paisajes boscosos.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Vogeler, J. C., Hudak, A. T., Vierling, L. A., & Vierling, K. T. (2013). Lidar-derived canopy architecture predicts brown creeper occupancy of two western coniferous forests. Condor, 115(3), 614-622. doi:10.1525/cond.2013.110082
Academic Affiliation
Series
Keyword
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-10-07T17:52:01Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 VogelerJodyCForestEcosystemsSocietyLidarDerivedCanopy.pdf: 233569 bytes, checksum: 750734d4bcc28e9e958a01dc3883c2aa (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-10-07T17:52:01Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 VogelerJodyCForestEcosystemsSocietyLidarDerivedCanopy.pdf: 233569 bytes, checksum: 750734d4bcc28e9e958a01dc3883c2aa (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-08
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deborah Campbell (deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-10-07T17:49:59Z No. of bitstreams: 1 VogelerJodyCForestEcosystemsSocietyLidarDerivedCanopy.pdf: 233569 bytes, checksum: 750734d4bcc28e9e958a01dc3883c2aa (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items