Soil compaction on a mechanized timber harvest operation in eastern Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/1831cq49q

Graduation date: 1989

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  • The use of mechanized harvest equipment has been increasing as an economical method to harvest small diameter timber. While the use of this equipment is increasing, little is known about associated soil compaction. In particular, little information exists on soil compaction caused by feller--bunchers. This study measured soil compaction caused by a mechanized harvest operation using 2 swing-boom, tracked feller-bunchers and 2 rubber-tired grapple skidders. The study took place on the LaGrande Ranger District of the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, located in eastern Oregon on volcanic ash soils. USDA Forest Service definitions of detrimental compaction (20% or greater increase in soil density over pre-activity levels) were used as a guideline to determine if detrimental compaction had occurred. Results show that 54% of the total area was impacted by either the feller-bunchers, skidders or both. Fellerbunchers impacted 19% of the total area and caused a statistically significant increase in soil bulk density of 8.8% when compared to before logging densities. Main skid trails covered 12% of the total area and had a statistically significant increase in soil density of 36.3%, when compared to before logging densities and was considered detrimentally compacted. These main skid trails were also feller-buncher trails. Thus, 12% of the total area was impacted by both feller-bunchers and skidders while 7% of the total area was impacted only by feller-bunchers. Twenty three percent of the total area received 1 to 4 skidder passes and was not in identifiable skid trails. Even these non-skid trail areas showed a statistically significant increase in soil density of 9.6% when compared to before logging densities. An additional 12% of the total area received 5 to 8 skidder passes and was also not in identifiable skid trails. This area showed a statistically significant increase in soil density of 19.8% and was considered detrimentally compacted. Regression analysis showed that slash significantly reduced compaction caused by feller-bunchers and skidders.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-05-05T15:40:52Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Zaborske, Richard MF.pdf: 478213 bytes, checksum: 06917e1c51830a1c94457b4cf6086f20 (MD5)
  • Explorer Site::Forest Explorer
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deborah Campbell (deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-05-04T23:07:13Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Zaborske, Richard MF.pdf: 478213 bytes, checksum: 06917e1c51830a1c94457b4cf6086f20 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-05-05T15:40:52Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Zaborske, Richard MF.pdf: 478213 bytes, checksum: 06917e1c51830a1c94457b4cf6086f20 (MD5)

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