Father-Child Transmission of School Adjustment: A Prospective Intergenerational Study Public Deposited

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This is an author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyrighted by the American Psychological Association and can be found at:  http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/dev/index.aspx. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.

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  • The intergenerational transmission of school adjustment was explored in a sample of 213 children and their fathers. The fathers were participants in a longitudinal study that began when they were in the fourth grade, and their children have been assessed at the ages of 21 months and 3, 5, and 7 years. Two components of school adjustment were measured: academic achievement and peer relations. Results show that the fathers’ academic achievement and peer relations were directly related to the same factors in their offspring even when the fathers’ educational attainment and both the fathers’ and the children’s general cognitive abilities were included in the models. When potential mechanisms of intergenerational transmission were examined, father’s age at the birth of the child, income, and educational expectations for the child were links in the transmission of academic achievement from one generation to the next. For peer relations across generations, income, inconsistent parenting, and educational expectations were links in transmission. Implications of these findings are considered, including the possibility that interventions to improve school adjustment in one generation might have significant and long-reaching effects for the next.
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  • Pears, K. C., Kim, H. K., Capaldi, D., Kerr, D. C. R., & Fisher, P. A. (2013). Father–child transmission of school adjustment: A prospective intergenerational study. Developmental Psychology, 49(4), 792-803. doi:10.1037/a0028543
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