Operating in an uneven-age management prescription Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/5t34sq549

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  • Forest managers in recent years have begun to re-examine the possibilities of using uneven-age silvicultural systems in the Oregon Coast Range. This increasing interest is being driven by a variety of forest resource nianagement concerns, including wildlife habitat diversity, visual aesthetics, and long-term sustained yield. In an effort to begin systematic exploration of coastal uneven-age silvicultural techniques, Oregon State University (OStJ) researchers have established a demonstration site at Forest Peak on OSU's Dunn Forest. This case study involving a single treatment at a single site reports on the design, performance, and cost of the skyline logging operation during Septeither and October 1992 which was designed to achieve the goals of an uneven-age management prescription prepared by OSU silvicultural and wildlife specialists. The operation harvested 13.9 MBF of 23-inch average dbh Douglas-fir and grand fir timber. The study tracked the time spent in planning and laying out the logging system. Field and office planning and layout procedures took 93.75 hours to conplete at a cost of $6.47/MBF. The project also involved detailed time studies and shiftlevel analyses of both the felling/bucking and the yarding phases of the logging operation. A two-nan felling crew produced 6.44 MBF/Hr at a cost of $1O.44/MBF. Cutting cycle time averaged 9.22 minutes per tree, with nixnther of logs per tree, cutting method (wedges or no wedges), percent ground slope, and base dianeter the most influential factors affecting cutting cycle time. The six-man yarding crew using a Thunderbird TTY5O yarder and small Danebo MSP carriage yarded 4.7 MBF/Hr at a cost of $58.51/MBF. Yarding cycle time averaged 5.73 minutes per turn, with corridor yarding distance, lateral yarding distance, choker setting method (pre-set or hot-set), and number of logs per turn the most influential factors affecting yrding cycle time. The six-man crew plus the hook tender averaged 1.82 hours for each change of yarding corridors. Corridor changes involved moving all rigging from one corridor to the next and repositioning the yarder if necessary. The hook tender alone spent an additional 1.31 hours per corridor pre-rigging tail trees, anchors, etc. Total logging cost including planning and layout, felling and bucking, yarding, loading, and equipment move-in was $104.03/MBF.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-04-08T18:25:32Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Alarid, Steve MF.pdf: 977186 bytes, checksum: 515c0f2d93289ba7806ae6d3a2a090b6 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-04-08T18:25:32Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Alarid, Steve MF.pdf: 977186 bytes, checksum: 515c0f2d93289ba7806ae6d3a2a090b6 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deborah Campbell (deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-04-08T18:21:16Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Alarid, Steve MF.pdf: 977186 bytes, checksum: 515c0f2d93289ba7806ae6d3a2a090b6 (MD5)

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