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Connecting Inventory Information Sources for Landscape Level Analyses Public Deposited

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This is the author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyrighted by The FBMIS Group and can be found at:  http://cms1.gre.ac.uk/conferences/iufro/fbmis/FBMISCov.htm.

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  • In forest landscape level analyses, forest information is commonly represented by separate polygons, defined by differences in species composition, stand structure, crown closure, and productivity. The simplest approach to projecting yield of stands over the land base is to create an aggregated yield table, weighted by area of each stand type (groups of polygons with similar attributes) as a means of projecting future volume per ha and other attributes. At the other end of complexity, each polygon is projected forward, using a particular management pathway where a record of each tree (and other elements) is maintained. Polygons may also be subdivided and/or recombined based on changes over time, and on features identified on other data sources (e.g., soils maps). As information needs increase, the trend has been toward the more complex approach to landscape level analysis. However, data are commonly limited, in terms of attributes, space, time, and management pathways represented. As a result, most resource managers rely on the very simple projection of forests in time, using an aggregated yield table. Others try to represent this spatial complexity via spatial mapping using polygons defined on aerial photography or other remotely sensed media. Gains have been made in presenting the spatial maps in Geographic Information Systems, and in producing models for a variety of attributes and management pathways, often by producing hybrid models. However, improved linkages between models, ground data, and spatial maps are needed, as are statements of model accuracy at larger spatial and temporal scales. For Canada, the spatial and temporal scales are particularly of interest, since the forested area is very large, and tree species have long life spans. This study discusses and compares commonly used methods to link data sources, using a small land area of about 5,000 ha located in British Columbia, Canada.
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  • LeMay, V. and H. Temesgen. 2005. Connecting inventory information sources for landscape level analyses. Forest Biometry, Modelling and Information Sciences. 1: 37-49.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-06-28T18:08:18Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 lemay_inventory_FBMIS_2005.pdf: 2377381 bytes, checksum: 86ec5055ade909b3848fb53ac695440d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-06-28T18:08:18Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 lemay_inventory_FBMIS_2005.pdf: 2377381 bytes, checksum: 86ec5055ade909b3848fb53ac695440d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2005-07-15
  • description.provenance : Rejected by Sue Kunda(sue.kunda@oregonstate.edu), reason: Publisher does not allow pdf to be deposited in ScholarsArchive@OSU. on 2012-05-18T23:43:04Z (GMT)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Logan Bernart (logan.bernart@gmail.com) on 2012-06-15T19:19:51Z No. of bitstreams: 1 lemay_inventory_FBMIS_2005.pdf: 2377381 bytes, checksum: 86ec5055ade909b3848fb53ac695440d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Logan Bernart (logan.bernart@gmail.com) on 2012-03-13T09:01:13Z No. of bitstreams: 1 CONNECTING INVENTORY INFORMATION SOURCES FOR LANDSCAPE LEVEL ANALYSES.pdf: 2520685 bytes, checksum: e69f1654b16ee149e0d7dae5657e1de3 (MD5)

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