A Stable Isotope Tracer Study of the Influences of Adjacent Land Use and Riparian Condition on Fates of Nitrate in Streams Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/c247ds53r

To the best of our knowledge, one or more authors of this paper were federal employees when contributing to this work. This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by Springer and can be found at:  http://www.springer.com/?SGWID=0-102-0-0-0.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The influence of land use on potential fates of nitrate (NO3-) in stream ecosystems, ranging from denitrification to storage in organic matter, has not been documented extensively. Here, we describe the Pacific Northwest component of Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiment, phase II (LINX II) to examine how land-use setting influences fates of NO3- in streams. We used 24 h releases of a stable isotope tracer ((NO3)-N-15-N) in nine streams flowing through forest, agricultural, and urban land uses to quantify NO3- uptake processes. NO3- uptake lengths varied two orders of magnitude (24-4247 m), with uptake rates (6.5-158.1 mg NO3-N m(-2) day(-1)) and uptake velocities (0.1-2.3 mm min(-1)) falling within the ranges measured in other LINX II regions. Denitrification removed 0-7% of added tracer from our streams. In forest streams, 60.4 to 77.0% of the isotope tracer was exported downstream as NO3-, with 8.0 to 14.8% stored in wood biofilms, epilithon, fine benthic organic matter, and bryophytes. Agricultural and urban streams with streamside forest buffers displayed hydrologic export and organic matter storage of tracer similar to those measured in forest streams. In agricultural and urban streams with a partial or no riparian buffer, less than 1 to 75% of the tracer was exported downstream; much of the remainder was taken up and stored in autotrophic organic matter components with short N turnover times. Our findings suggest restoration and maintenance of riparian forests can help re-establish the natural range of NO3- uptake processes in human-altered streams.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Sobota, D. J., Johnson, S. L., Gregory, S. V., & Ashkenas, L. R. (2012). A stable isotope tracer study of the influences of adjacent land use and riparian condition on fates of nitrate in streams. Ecosystems, 15(1), 1-17. doi: 10.1007/s10021-011-9489-8
Academic Affiliation
Series
Keyword
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-01-23T18:35:21Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 SobotaDanielJFisheriesWildlifeStableIsotopeTracer.pdf: 799914 bytes, checksum: 8b62fd0bc03a53097237907821b2643d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2011-10-12
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deborah Campbell (deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-01-23T17:15:22Z No. of bitstreams: 1 SobotaDanielJFisheriesWildlifeStableIsotopeTracer.pdf: 799914 bytes, checksum: 8b62fd0bc03a53097237907821b2643d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-01-23T18:35:21Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 SobotaDanielJFisheriesWildlifeStableIsotopeTracer.pdf: 799914 bytes, checksum: 8b62fd0bc03a53097237907821b2643d (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/06/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items