Transitional Effects of Double-lateral Drip Irrigation and Straw Mulch on Irrigation Water Consumption, Mineral Nutrition, Yield, and Storability of Sweet Cherry Public Deposited

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  • A field trial was conducted on a Cherryhill silt loam soil at The Dalles, OR, from 2006 to 2008. The impacts of switching from the traditional micro sprinkler irrigation (MS) to double-lateral drip irrigation (DD) and from no groundcover with herbicide control of weeds (NC) to in-row wheat (Triticum aestivum) straw mulching (ST) were evaluated in a split-plot design with four replicates. Irrigation water use, mineral nutrition, and productivity of ‘Lapins’ sweet cherry (Prunus avium) on ‘Mazzard’ rootstock (P. avium) and soil quality were measured on a plot basis. DD reduced irrigation water consumption by 47.6% to 58.2% compared with MS. Straw mulch lowered irrigation water use by 9.7% relative to NC. Total fruit yield and fruit quality of firmness, size, and sugar at harvest were similar for the irrigation treatments. Straw mulch increased fruit size by 0.6 mm on average relative to NC, which could result in increased grower profitability. The DD system enhanced percentage of marketable fruit by 8.6% relative to MS. Leaf phosphorus (P), boron (B), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) concentrations were reduced with DD over MS; consequently, more P, B, Zn, and Fe fertilizers might be needed under DD. Straw mulch markedly decreased the populations of flagellates and amoebae but slightly increased the population of ciliates. Straw mulch resulted in a soil microbial community with remarkably less protozoa. Overall, DD is a viable alternate irrigation system for producing sweet cherry orchards with limited water resources for irrigation. Switching from NC to ST could lower irrigation water use, reduce herbicide runoff, and protect soil from erosion.
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  • Yin, X., Long, L., Huang, X., Jaja, N., Bai, J., Seavert, C., & le Roux, J. (2012). Transitional effects of double-lateral drip irrigation and straw mulch on irrigation water consumption, mineral nutrition, yield, and storability of sweet cherry. HortTechnology, 22(4), 484-492.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-04-23T00:32:17Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LongLynnHorticultureTransitionalEffectsDouble(Compressed).pdf: 246732 bytes, checksum: 487e1a61db1ced39a095b1f660dff069 (MD5)
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