The effects of swinging and sorting with a skidder on yarding and loading efficiency in small diameter Douglas-fir Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/g158bp55m

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  • This study evaluated the impact of using a rubber-tired skidder to keep the landing clear by sorting and decking the logs along the road prior to loading by a self-loading truck. The evaluation was accomplished through detailed time studies conducted on a Koller K-300 yarder, a Crown Super 3000 self-loader, and a John Deere 440 choker skidder, in a selective thinning of a Coast Range Douglas-fir stand with n average diameter range of eight to twelve inches. Production increases on the yarding cycle were observed when the skidder was used to keep the landing clear. A major factor for higher production rates was reduced landing delays. Comparisons of the loading operation from decks built by the yarder and by the skidder showed a significant time savings when loading from skidder decks. The portions of the loading cycle most affected were the sort and swing loaded elements. The analysis indicated that sorteddecks oriented at small angles to the road and decked as high as possible required the shortest loading time. The skidding cycle was evaluated frm a mechanical engineering approach and compared to regression analysis results. The results snowed that the skidder was capable of production rates in excess of 10 cunits per hour. The hooking and decking elements consumed the largest portion of the skidding cycle. An alternate method of hooking or investigation of a grapple attachment is suggested. Important factors influencing the harvesting of a unit were identified and a model was developed to aid in planning. The influence of landing geometry as related to log holding capabilities of a landing, log diameter, and stems removed per acre are explored. Despite an improvement in overall production, the skidder did not prove cost effective for the study when its full cost was charged to yarding production. There were indications, however, that the skidder or a loader may be a necessity for longer yarding distances, flat decking slopes, high stem removals, or larger diameter trees. The skidder cost benefit ratio may also be improved if the skidder or operator remain active in the overall harvest operation when not needed for swinging and sorting.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-05-06T22:45:10Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 McIntire, John MF.pdf: 658598 bytes, checksum: e8bb065f7778bf9385e6dbad261ce6ca (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-05-06T22:45:10Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 McIntire, John MF.pdf: 658598 bytes, checksum: e8bb065f7778bf9385e6dbad261ce6ca (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deborah Campbell (deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-05-04T17:38:32Z No. of bitstreams: 1 McIntire, John MF.pdf: 658598 bytes, checksum: e8bb065f7778bf9385e6dbad261ce6ca (MD5)

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