Sustainable energy for Galena, Alaska: Timber Harvest Management Plan Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/gq67jx34p

Graduation date: 2015

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  • Increased energy costs have prompted the rural village of Galena, Alaska to explore viable alternatives for heat and power generation. Continued dependency on petroleum products will cause the community’s economic driving force, the Galena Interior Learning Academy (GILA), to face uncertain operability. A wood-fired boiler is scheduled to be installed, replacing an antiquated diesel driven steam system. Collectively, several community entities have formed a non-profit organization, Sustainable Energy for Galena, Alaska, Inc. (SEGA), which has been tasked to provide the required biomass material. The purpose of this report is to describe the unique socio-ecological conditions within the Galena Working Circle (GWC) and to recommend management strategies that strive to balance a wide-range of local values. A properly implemented harvest management plan will place SEGA and the wood-fired utility in a position to help stabilize the community’s economic foundation, promote valuable educational opportunities, sustainably utilize local fuel sources and introduce a new economic sector to the village. As the project matures from one phase to the next, a host of limitations (e.g., budget constraints, land access, weather conditions) and uncertainties (e.g., best handling and storage design, acceptable locations of harvest units) have and will continue to emerge. Fuel requirement calculations suggest 1800 gt of Balsam poplar at 40% MCwb will satisfy the annual heat load of 17.7 x10^9 Btu. A well-organized fuel supply chain will need to incorporate in-field drying, cost effective transportation and a chip processing, storage and handling scenario appropriate for extreme weather conditions. Compared to the status quo, use of the wood-boiler system will provide a cost savings of nearly 50% for the end consumer. Public involvement in the decision-making process is key to utilizing a local renewable fuel source and developing a plan that allows efficient delivery without compromising the quality of life present within a unique rural lifestyle.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-12-07T17:29:52Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) KalkeTimothyR2015.pdf: 2639260 bytes, checksum: 28c4c42785367e244a5593cde3354b70 (MD5)
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