Anomalous seafloor spreading of the Southeast Indian Ridge near the Amsterdam-St. Paul Plateau Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/h989r474m

Copyrighted by American Geophysical Union.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The Amsterdam-St. Paul Plateau is bisected by the intermediate-rate spreading Southeast Indian Ridge, and numerous geophysical and tectonic anomalies arise from the interactions of the Amsterdam-St. Paul hotspot and the spreading center. The plate boundary geometry on the hotspot platform evolves rapidly (on timescales <1 Myr), off-axis volcanism is abundant, the seafloor does not deepen away from the axis, and transform faults do not have fracture zone extensions. Away from the hotspot platform the ridge-transform geometry is typical of mid-ocean ridges globally. In contrast, the Amsterdam-St. Paul Plateau spreading segments are shorter, they often overlap each other significantly, and the intervening discontinuities are smaller, more ephemeral, and more migratory. Abyssal hills are smaller and less uniform on the hotspot platform than on neighboring spreading segments. From gravity and isostasy analysis the average thickness of the platform crust is ~10 km, approximately 50% thicker than that of typical oceanic crust. Most of the isostatic compensation of the hotspot plateau occurs at the Moho or within the lower crust, and the effective elastic thickness of the plateau lithosphere is ~1.6 km, less than half that of adjacent spreading segments. Away from the platform some transform faults contain intratransform spreading centers; on the platform two transform faults have valleys which may be depocenters for abundant axial or off-axis volcanism and mass wasting. Although not well-constrained by magnetic coverage the Amsterdam-St. Paul hotspot appears to have been “captured” by the Southeast Indian Ridge, enhancing crustal production at the ridge since about 3.5 Ma. Prior to this time the hotspot formed a line of smaller, isolated volcanoes on older Australian plate. The underlying cause for the present-day crustal accretion anomalies is the effect of melt generation from separate sources of mantle upwelling (due to plate spreading and the hotspot) which has a consequent effect of weakening the lithosphere.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Scheirer, D., D. Forsyth, J. Conder, M. Eberle, S.‐H. Hung, K. Johnson, and D. Graham (2000), Anomalous seafloor spreading of the Southeast Indian Ridge near the Amsterdam‐St. Paul Plateau, J. Geophys. Res., 105(B4), 8243-8262.
Series
Rights Statement
Publisher
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by David Moynihan (dmscanner@gmail.com) on 2010-05-17T20:30:27Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Scheirer_et_al_JGR_2000.pdf: 4642727 bytes, checksum: efb290255484a01e507dcc4ed52f9fe6 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2010-05-17T20:54:10Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Scheirer_et_al_JGR_2000.pdf: 4642727 bytes, checksum: efb290255484a01e507dcc4ed52f9fe6 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2010-05-17T20:54:10Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Scheirer_et_al_JGR_2000.pdf: 4642727 bytes, checksum: efb290255484a01e507dcc4ed52f9fe6 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2000-04-10

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items