Nano-scale investigation of the association of microbial nitrogen residues with iron (hydr)oxides in a forest soil O-horizon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/jw827c415

This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by Elsevier and can be found at:  http://www.journals.elsevier.com/geochimica-et-cosmochimica-acta/. To the best of our knowledge, one or more authors of this paper were federal employees when contributing to this work.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Amino sugars in fungal cell walls (such as chitin) represent an important source of nitrogen (N) in many forest soil ecosystems. Despite the importance of this material in soil nitrogen cycling, comparatively little is known about abiotic and biotic controls on and the timescale of its turnover. Part of the reason for this lack of information is the inaccessibility of these materials to classic bulk extraction methods. To address this issue, we used advanced visualization tools to examine transformation pathways of chitin-rich fungal cell wall residues as they interact with microorganisms, soil organic matter and mineral surfaces. Our goal was to document initial micro-scale dynamics of the incorporation of ¹³C- and ¹⁵N-labeled chitin into fungi-dominated microenvironments in O-horizons of old-growth forest soils. At the end of a 3-week incubation experiment, high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of hyphae-associated soil microstructures revealed a preferential association of ¹⁵N with Fe-rich particles. Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) of the same samples showed that thin organic coatings on these soil microstructures are enriched in aliphatic C and amide N on Fe (hydr)oxides, suggesting a concentration of microbial lipids and proteins on these surfaces. A possible explanation for the results of our micro-scale investigation of chemical and spatial patterns is that amide N from chitinous fungal cell walls was assimilated by hyphae-associated bacteria, resynthesized into proteinaceous amide N, and subsequently concentrated onto Fe (hydr)oxide surfaces. If confirmed in other soil ecosystems, such rapid association of microbial N with hydroxylated Fe oxide surfaces may have important implications for mechanistic models of microbial cycling of C and N.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Keiluweit, M., Bougoure, J., Zeglin, L., Myrold, D., Weber, P., Pett-Ridge, J., . . . . (2012). Nano-scale investigation of the association of microbial nitrogen residues with iron (hydr)oxides in a forest soil O-horizon. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 95, 213-226. doi: 10.1016/j.gca.2012.07.001
Academic Affiliation
Series
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-11-16T01:36:40Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 MyroldDavidCropSoilScienceNanoScaleInvestigation.pdf: 979163 bytes, checksum: 94aec60b9a6486828629ea2d074426a3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deanne Bruner (deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-11-16T01:11:14Z No. of bitstreams: 1 MyroldDavidCropSoilScienceNanoScaleInvestigation.pdf: 979163 bytes, checksum: 94aec60b9a6486828629ea2d074426a3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-11-16T01:36:40Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 MyroldDavidCropSoilScienceNanoScaleInvestigation.pdf: 979163 bytes, checksum: 94aec60b9a6486828629ea2d074426a3 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012-10-15

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/11/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items