Identifying genomic and metabolic features that can underlie early successional and opportunistic lifestyles of human gut symbionts Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/mc87pr89k

This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press and can be found at:  http://www.cshlpress.com/.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • We lack a deep understanding of genetic and metabolic attributes specializing in microbial consortia for initial and subsequent waves of colonization of our body habitats. Here we show that phylogenetically interspersed bacteria in Clostridium cluster XIVa, an abundant group of bacteria in the adult human gut also known as the Clostridium coccoides or Eubacterium rectale group, contains species that have evolved distribution patterns consistent with either early successional or stable gut communities. The species that specialize to the infant gut are more likely to associate with systemic infections and can reach high abundances in individuals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), indicating that a subset of the microbiota that have adapted to pioneer/opportunistic lifestyles may do well in both early development and with disease. We identified genes likely selected during adaptation to pioneer/opportunistic lifestyles as those for which early succession association and not phylogenetic relationships explain genomic abundance. These genes reveal potential mechanisms by which opportunistic gut bacteria tolerate osmotic and oxidative stress and potentially important aspects of their metabolism. These genes may not only be biomarkers of properties associated with adaptation to early succession and disturbance, but also leads for developing therapies aimed at promoting reestablishment of stable gut communities following physiologic or pathologic disturbances.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Lozupone, C., Faust, K., Raes, J., Faith, J. J., Frank, D. N., Zaneveld, J., & Gordon, J. I. (2012, October). Identifying genomic and metabolic features that can underlie early successional and opportunistic lifestyles of human gut symbionts. Genome Research, 22(10), 1974-1984. doi:10.1101/gr.138198.112
Academic Affiliation
Series
Keyword
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-03-21T15:21:02Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 3 license_rdf: 22765 bytes, checksum: 56265f5776a16a05899187d30899c530 (MD5) license_text: 0 bytes, checksum: d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e (MD5) ZaneveldJesseMicrobiologyIdentifyingGenomicMetabolic.pdf: 1524789 bytes, checksum: fdf3fab1af56aac21953f5a741d4f08b (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012-10
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-03-21T15:21:02Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 3 license_rdf: 22765 bytes, checksum: 56265f5776a16a05899187d30899c530 (MD5) license_text: 0 bytes, checksum: d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e (MD5) ZaneveldJesseMicrobiologyIdentifyingGenomicMetabolic.pdf: 1524789 bytes, checksum: fdf3fab1af56aac21953f5a741d4f08b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deborah Campbell (deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-03-21T14:35:01Z No. of bitstreams: 3 license_rdf: 22765 bytes, checksum: 56265f5776a16a05899187d30899c530 (MD5) license_text: 0 bytes, checksum: d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e (MD5) ZaneveldJesseMicrobiologyIdentifyingGenomicMetabolic.pdf: 1524789 bytes, checksum: fdf3fab1af56aac21953f5a741d4f08b (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/21/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items