Arsenic Reduction in Drinking Water and Improvement in Skin Lesions: A Follow-Up Study in Bangladesh Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/mp48sd65s

This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and can be found at:  http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/. Reproduced with permission from Environmental Health Perspectives.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • BACKGROUND: Chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with skin lesions. However, it is not known whether reducing arsenic exposure will improve skin lesions. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the association between reduced arsenic exposures and skin lesion recovery over time. METHODS: A follow-up study of 550 individuals was conducted in 2009-2011 on a baseline population of skin lesion cases (n = 900) previously enrolled in Bangladesh in 2001-2003. Arsenic in drinking water and toenails, and skin lesion status and severity were ascertained at baseline and follow-up. We used logistic regression and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to evaluate the association between log(10)-transformed arsenic exposure and skin lesion persistence and severity. RESULTS: During the study period, water arsenic concentrations decreased in this population by 41% overall, and 65 individuals who had skin lesions at baseline had no identifiable lesions at follow-up. In the adjusted models, every log(10) decrease in water arsenic and toenail arsenic was associated with 22% [odds ratio (OR) = 1.22; 95% CI: 0.85, 1.78] and 4.5 times (OR = 4.49; 95% CI: 1.94, 11.1) relative increase in skin lesion recovery, respectively. In addition, lower baseline arsenic levels were significantly associated with increased odds of recovery. A log(10) decrease in toenail arsenic from baseline to follow-up was also significantly associated with reduced skin lesion severity in cases over time (mean score change of -5.22 units; 95% CI: -8.61, -1.82). CONCLUSIONS: Reducing arsenic exposure increased the odds that an individual with skin lesions would recover or show less severe lesions within 10 years. Reducing arsenic exposure must remain a public health priority in Bangladesh and in other regions affected by arsenic-contaminated water.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Seow, W. J., Christiani, D. C., Pan, W., Kile, M. L., Baccarelli, A. A., Quamruzzaman, Q., . . . Lin, X. (2012). Arsenic reduction in drinking water and improvement in skin lesions: A follow-up study in bangladesh. Environmental Health Perspectives, 120(12), 1733. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1205381
Academic Affiliation
Series
Keyword
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deborah Campbell (deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-02-20T18:13:21Z No. of bitstreams: 1 KileMollyLPublicHealthHumanSciencesArsenicReductionDrinking.pdf: 289840 bytes, checksum: 5a33feecc7cd87ccdd582e526a496e6d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-02-20T18:14:27Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 KileMollyLPublicHealthHumanSciencesArsenicReductionDrinking.pdf: 289840 bytes, checksum: 5a33feecc7cd87ccdd582e526a496e6d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012-12
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-02-20T18:14:27Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 KileMollyLPublicHealthHumanSciencesArsenicReductionDrinking.pdf: 289840 bytes, checksum: 5a33feecc7cd87ccdd582e526a496e6d (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/13/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items