Effects of disturbance scale on soil microbial communities in the Western Cascades of Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/rr171z77x

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  • To gain a better understanding of how rapidly microbial communities respond to different magnitudes of perturbation that mimic minor or catastrophic disturbances. Two montane sites in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon with adjacent areas of forest and meadow vegetation were studied. A reciprocal transplant experiment evaluated both minor (soil cores remaining in the same vegetation type) or more severe disturbance (soil cores transferred to a different vegetation type). The biomass and composition of the bacterial and fungal communities were measured for 2 years following the establishment of the experiment. Minor disturbance (coring) had little impact on microbial biomass but transferring between vegetation type showed greater fungal biomass in soil incubated in the forest environment. The composition of bacterial communities was not influenced by coring but responded strongly to transfers between vegetation sites, changing to reflect their new environment after 2 years. Fungal community composition responded somewhat to coring, probably from disrupting mycorrhizal fungal hyphae, but more strongly to being transferred to a new environment. The response of the microbial community to major disturbance was rapid, showing shifts reflective of their new environment within 2 years, suggesting that microbial communities have the capacity to quickly adjust to catastrophic disturbances.
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  • Kageyama, S. A., Posavatz, N. R., Jones, S. S., Waterstripe, K. E., Bottomley, P. J., Cromack Jr, K., & Myrold, D. D. (2013). Effects of disturbance scale on soil microbial communities in the western cascades of oregon. Plant and Soil, 372(1), 459-471. doi:10.1007/s11104-013-1760-70
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deborah Campbell (deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-11-25T18:27:09Z No. of bitstreams: 1 BottomleyPeterJMicrobiologyEffectsDisturbanceScale.pdf: 359905 bytes, checksum: 45fbbb78e632d813ce29f26f78a9d8da (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-11-25T18:28:59Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 BottomleyPeterJMicrobiologyEffectsDisturbanceScale.pdf: 359905 bytes, checksum: 45fbbb78e632d813ce29f26f78a9d8da (MD5)
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