Geology of the Seal Rock Area Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/t722hd73c

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Twelve years ago I was new to the Oregon coast and eager to learn about the natural setting. Field guides were available to birds, marine mammals, tide pools, seaweeds, and forest plants. Not so geology. I looked at a field guide to rocks and minerals, but it was hard to connect those photos with the basalt and the bluff I saw at the beach. I wished for a nontechnical book about local landforms to tell me about their origin and age. To my knowledge, that volume still doesn’t exist. This work is one layperson’s attempt to fill the void and share what I’ve learned. I discuss how the sedimentary rocks, basalt, marine terraces and sea cliffs in this area were formed and where they are visible. Also included are sections on paleontology and buried forests. Finally, a discussion of earthquakes and tsunamis looks at evidence of past activity in our locality and how these forces may affect the geomorphology of the coast in the future. Marcel Proust once wrote, “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” Learning local geology has helped me develop a fresh eye to my surroundings and live with greater awareness of the meanings and attachments that connect us to this place, this earth: home. This article is intended for residents and visitors interested in learning more about their surroundings. Geological information can make for dense reading, best absorbed a little at a time. I’ve kept the use of abbreviations and technical language to a minimum. Only four geologic time periods are mentioned frequently: the Oligocene and Miocene for local bedrock and basalt, and the more recent Pleistocene and Holocene for marine terraces and sand dunes. Those who wish to read in greater depth may find the list of references helpful. Since I am not a geologist, I first read popular and scientific works, then communicated with knowledgeable people.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Table of Contents
  • Preface 6 I. Introduction 7 II. Early Origins 10 III. Sedimentary Rock 12 IV. Basalt at Seal Rock 27 V. Other Coastal Basalts 41 VI. Paleontology 51 VII. Weathering, Erosion, Wave Action 54 VIII. Changing Sea Levels 58 IX. Marine Terraces, Sea Cliffs and Sand 61 X. Buried Forests 73 XI. Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Subsidence, Uplift 77 XII. The Past Hundred Years 81 XIII. The Future 83 XIV. References 84
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-01-16T15:38:56Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 final-geology-of-the-seal-rock-area2.pdf: 10598150 bytes, checksum: e296ea14e3499b2343c19e2e0e656b27 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Ruth Vondracek(ruth.vondracek@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-01-16T15:38:56Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 final-geology-of-the-seal-rock-area2.pdf: 10598150 bytes, checksum: e296ea14e3499b2343c19e2e0e656b27 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Janet Webster (janet.webster@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-12-27T21:47:40Z No. of bitstreams: 1 final-geology-of-the-seal-rock-area2.pdf: 10598150 bytes, checksum: e296ea14e3499b2343c19e2e0e656b27 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 09/25/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items