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Permanence for wood siding Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/wh246t56j

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  • Until the last decade, decay in siding did not present a problem. When it occurred it was usually limited to a few boards where there had been some obvious error; for example at points where large amounts of rain water were allowed to run down the wall from leaks in rain gutters or clogged downspouts, or where the bottom board was in contact with the soil. About 1940, complaints began to come in of building projects in which there was extensive decay of siding on new buildings. These were mainly in Florida and the coastal area of the Gulf States, where humidity is high and the weather is warm enough for decay fungi to work during most of the year. It was feared that a lot more trouble would develop. Sapwood, now more widely used for siding, is more subject to decay for two reasons; (1) it absorbs water much more quickly than heart-wood, and (2) it lacks the natural preservative chemicals that are contained in the heartwood of the more durable species. But while cases in which most of the houses in a project were damaged have continued to appear, by far the greater number of housing developments have remained free from difficulty. Through a period of years, studies have been made of 15 projects in 9 different States from which complaints had been received, and for comparison, on numerous other houses or projects scattered through the Southern States. From these and from experimental wall panels exposed at the Harrison Experimental Forest of the U. S. Forest Service, we believe that we know the principal reasons why some projects have suffered and others have not, and how future construction can be readily safeguarded.
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  • File scanned at 300 ppi using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 5.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
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