Assessing Truth in the Information Age: Evidence from Politifact Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_projects/2j62s664t

2012

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Despite unprecedented access to information, the American public has been shown to have difficulty distinguishing factually correct information from misinformation. Misinformation can, and does, alter voting patterns and policy preferences which impact the range of policy solutions available to policymakers. In recent years, media organizations have begun specialized ‘fact-­‐checking’ operations in order to address misinformation in American politics and public policy-­‐ reviewing claims made by political actors in order to separate fact from fiction. Using data from the 2010 Congressional Elections and the fact-­‐checking organization Politifact, this paper looks factors affecting the accuracy of claims made by persons running for Congress in 2010.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-10-19T00:24:22Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 michael_nash_mpp.pdf: 710974 bytes, checksum: 17682532b3beb919e50766e2f19c2484 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Brent Steel (bsteel@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-10-19T00:24:22Z No. of bitstreams: 1 michael_nash_mpp.pdf: 710974 bytes, checksum: 17682532b3beb919e50766e2f19c2484 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items