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Drainage structures for logging roads with special reference to Philippine conditions Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_projects/37720j368

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  • Drainage may be defined as the science or directing the removal of excess surface and ground water in such a manner as to safeguard the best interests of all concerned. Its ultimate objective in roads is the prevention of damage or failure of the road surface and subgrade by the action of storm water, seepage, underground flow, and capillary rise. The stability of roads is greatly affected by excess water due to the reduction of the soil bearing capacity. The importance of drainage in any logging operation should be considered during the time of planning, design, construction, use and maintenance of roads. Sometimes a good road becomes impassable at a very vital time due to the absence or damage of a drainage structure. On the other hand, a poor road may be usable at such a time due to the presence of a good drainage structure. In the Philippines, the industry is very exacting in its demands. Log exportation and the growing plywood industry demand fresh and good-quality logs. In the tropics it is not a good practice to leave logs in the woods or landings for a long period of time to wait tor good weather. They have to be moved and dumped into the log pond within 24 hours after felling to prevent or minimize the attack or pin-hole and bark borers. Hot logging requires logging roads to be maintained always in good condition for truck hauling regardless of the weather condition. And maintenance in logging roads is almost always in reference to drainage. This paper is a bibliography of drainage structures ranging from the cheapest and most primitive to the most modern and expensive ones. Much of the information and data presented come from the review of available written material on road drainage and through observations and consultations by the author in the field in the Philippines, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Montana, and Idaho.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-05-06T21:16:30Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Mordeno, Angelo MF.pdf: 2101854 bytes, checksum: 381d7a4e718c907437d3ff739dbbe001 (MD5)
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