Today, Tomorrow, and Every Day After That: How Commercial Salmon Fishermen in Bristol Bay, Alaska Define and Work Toward a Sustainable Salmon Fishery. Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_projects/3r074w760

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  • Rising human global population, appetite for seafood, and the effects of climate change have pushed commercial marine fisheries around the globe onto trajectories that are chillingly unsustainable. Input from fishermen on what it means to have a “sustainable fishery” is often absent or ignored. Some commercial fisheries are lauded for their sustainability. This study looked at the successful case of the Bristol Bay sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) commercial fishery to determine whether, how, and why Bristol Bay commercial salmon fishermen conceptualize and work toward a more sustainable future for their fishery. Findings suggest that while fishermen care deeply about the sustainability of their fishery, they see their role in achieving that goal to be focused on advocating for their specific fishery to increase social capital, and taking steps to enhance the quality of their product to improve the economic viability of the fishery. In the course of the study, it became apparent that Bristol Bay fishermen were deeply concerned about and motivated to action by the proposed Pebble Mine. It was also revealed that fishermen might not have fully understood the roles and limitations of fishery managers when it came to public advocacy on issues like Pebble Mine. This may indicate that commercial fishermen and managers are on a course toward a toxic relationship, which threatens the sustainability of the fishery. Policy and research recommendations are included in the conclusion.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-06-17T21:22:52Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Kuletz_MPP_Essay.pdf: 925292 bytes, checksum: 9ea250aaebf022424a0d2847e08fab9e (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Brent Steel (bsteel@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-06-15T22:31:55Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Kuletz_MPP_Essay.pdf: 925292 bytes, checksum: 9ea250aaebf022424a0d2847e08fab9e (MD5)

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