A Comparison of the Preferred Role of Science and Scientists in the Marine and Terrestrial Policy Process Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_projects/8623j033m

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  • The role of science in marine policy, and environmental policy in general, is a debated topic. Currently, there is an increasing desire for transparent and participatory democracy that involves more input from local residents and other non-experts. These demands often conflict with the increasing complexity of problems and the real or perceived mandate to use the “best available science” in policymaking. There have been few attempts to incorporate scientists’ input into marine policymaking in the United States, while around the world we have seen scientific information used in marine policymaking at a higher rate. We have also witnessed a shift in the acceptance of science and scientist involvement in terrestrial policymaking. The literature suggests there are barriers that must be overcome in order to involve science and scientists in marine policymaking, including collaboration and engagement with policymakers who have different agendas than scientists. In order to better understand these differences in how science and scientists are being integrated into marine and terrestrial policymaking, I analyzed and compared two surveys that asked managers, scientists, and other stakeholders their beliefs regarding the role of science and scientists in (1) terrestrial and (2) marine policy. I hypothesized that there was a significant difference between the preferred role of scientists in terrestrial and marine policy among all groups surveyed. After analysis, we found no significant differences between the two studies and their preferred role of scientists in terrestrial and marine policymaking.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-05-31T23:06:02Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Daniel_Kloepfer_MPP_ESSAY.pdf: 289293 bytes, checksum: 3ec7f15f41c706d3c5501699707433bd (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-05-20
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Brent Steel (bsteel@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-31T16:47:43Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Daniel_Kloepfer_MPP_ESSAY.pdf: 289293 bytes, checksum: 3ec7f15f41c706d3c5501699707433bd (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-31T23:06:02Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Daniel_Kloepfer_MPP_ESSAY.pdf: 289293 bytes, checksum: 3ec7f15f41c706d3c5501699707433bd (MD5)

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