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Do Community Driven Development (CDD) Programs Improve Social Relationships measured by Perceived Discrimination among Different Ethnicities in Nepal? Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_projects/jq085m68b

2011

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  • Community driven development (CDD) is one of the recent approaches in the development arena that integrates people into mainstream development. Bringing people together into the development prospects through social capital is an important aspect of this approach that harnesses greater social inclusion and wider participation at the grass root level. CDD is expected to provide equal access to information, equal distribution of resources and opportunities to exercise power at the local level irrespective of gender, social status, class or ethnicity. Nepal is a diverse country in terms of caste, ethnicity, culture and traditions. Although “unity in diversity” is the metaphor used to explain social harmony in the country, segregation of the population based on social identities and affiliation exacerbates the development prospects. Using data from Poverty Alleviation Fund (PAF) Nepal- an organization working for community development at the national level, this paper tries to explain whether such a development intervention is improving social relationships measured by perceived discrimination among diverse ethnicities in Nepal.
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