Solar Photovoltaics: Comparisons of Different Approaches and Technologies Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_projects/rr171x313

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  • Solar photovoltaic is considered one among many new alternatives to satisfy our demand for energy. Solar Cells have undergone changes in the last 50 years or so since its invention in 1954. Solar power is beginning to challenge conventional energy sources in terms of mainstream acceptance. Solar power along with other renewable energy sources could satisfy the energy needs of people in the developing and undeveloped countries (and even some state nations within the US.) This project report will provide an overview and comparisons of current solar photovoltaics. Different approaches for solar cells include mature conventional methods using crystalline silicon to maturing methods like thin film solar cells to potentially disruptive technologies like organic based solar cells. This project report will compare and contrast the different approaches and their novel solutions. Ultimately in order for solar photovoltaic cells to gain mainstream acceptance and compete against today’s prices on conventional energy sources, solar photovoltaics needs to be efficient, stable, and economically feasible to the consumer. Solutions to improve solar photovoltaics in terms of improving efficiency and lower cost will be examined.
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  • TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Introduction..................................................................................................................1 1.1 Motivation............................................................................................................2 1.2 Report Organization.............................................................................................2 2 Crystalline Photovoltaic Cells......................................................................................3 2.1 Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic...........................................................................4 2.2 Theoretical Limits on Conversion Efficiency......................................................7 2.3 Heterojunction Intrinsic Thin Layer Solar Cell ...................................................9 2.4 Outlook on Crystalline Photovoltaic Solar Cells ...............................................10 3 Photovoltaic Cell Texturing.......................................................................................11 3.1 Anti-Reflection Coatings ...................................................................................11 3.2 Surface Texturing...............................................................................................12 3.2.1 Early Texturing Techniques.......................................................................13 3.2.2 Black Silicon Towers .................................................................................15 3.2.3 Using Bio-Mimicry ....................................................................................16 3.3 Developments in Surface Texturing ..................................................................19 4 Thin-Film Photovoltaic Cells.....................................................................................20 4.1 Common Structures............................................................................................21 4.2 Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide ...................................................................21 4.3 Cadmium Telluride ............................................................................................23 4.4 Amorphous Silicon ............................................................................................24 4.5 Outlook on Thin Film Photovoltaics..................................................................26 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) Page 5 Organic Pigment Based Photovoltaics.......................................................................27 5.1 Dye Sensitive Solar Cells...................................................................................28 5.2 Polymer-Polymer Solar Cells.............................................................................30 5.3 Potentials of Organic Solar Cells .......................................................................32 6 Conclusion .................................................................................................................33 Bibliography .................................................................................................................35 Appendices....................................................................................................................39
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-12-14T15:27:53Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 louie_solar_pv_proj_rpt_approved.pdf: 2509594 bytes, checksum: ae1750ffa81a14a280efe84626378cb9 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2009-12-11
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