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Vegetation ecology of Fraxinus latifolia communities in William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_projects/t435gd620

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  • Composition and structure of Oregon ash (Fraxinus latifolia) woodlands in the William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon are described. Twenty stands dominated by Fraxinus latifolia were sampled with 500 m2 circular macroplots in which floristic microplot data were collected for plant community synthesis. Plant communities were identified by computer-assisted tabular analysis and hierarchical agglomerative clustering. Community structure was analyzed from tree-diameter frequency distribution. Two provisional plant communities are identified: Fraxinus latifolia/Carex obnupta and Fraxinus latifolia/ Symphoricarpos albus. The Carex obnupta community was characterized by C. obnupta, Eleocharis acicularis arid Galium trifidum. Little shrub cover and appreciable bare ground were typical. Carex and Eleocharis often formed single-species patches within the stands. Overstory tree canopy was closed and most plots contained many small-diameter trees and reproductive stems and few large diameter trees. Fraxinus tree size-class distribution approximates an attenuated reverse Jshaped curve. The Symphoricarpos albus community was marked by much shrub cover, principally provided by S. albus, Rubus ursinus and Rosa nutkana. Herb cover also was great in which Agrostis aequivalvis, Galium aparine, Geum macrophyllum, Montia sibirica, Ranunculus unicinatus and Stel].aria calycantha were prominent. Overstory tree cover was more open than in the Carex obnupta community. Tree diameter age-class distribution was even, and total basal area larger than for the Carex community. Although environmental data were not collected, the Fraxinus/Carex community was observed on slightly lower "back-water" areas more distant from the water courses while the Fraxinus/ Symphoricarpos community was found either on stream natural levees or at outer margins of the lower "backwater" areas away from streams.
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