Graduate Project

 

A monitoring system for identifying and recording land conversion in agricultural lands with SCS Soil Capability Classes I-IV Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_projects/vq27zp152

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  • This paper discusses the structure, rationale, and application of a monitoring system specifically designed to identify and record conversion of lands with Soil Conservation Service Soil Capability Classes I-IV. Research methodology and design are structured to objectively assess the rates of agricultural land conversion to non-farm uses over a given time interval. A systematic sampling procedure is undertaken in the sample stratum defined by the quarter mile corridor on one or both sides of all established roads in those areas with Class I-IV soils and outside 1980 incorporated city limits. The sampling stratification assumes that conversion of lands with soils in Classes I-IV outside the quarter mile sampling corridor is either negligible or non-existent; that no new roads were constructed on Class I-IV soils outside the sample stratum during the study period; that all Class I-IV lands incorporated into city limits during the study period are converted. Photointerpretation of aerial photography is the information source used to determine land use status (converted or non-converted) at each of the sample sites. Land conversion is defined by the presence of site modifications which preclude agricultural activities; agricultural fields, farmsteads, and unmodified or natural environments are categorized as non-converted sites. The proportion of sample sites converted during the study period represents the proportion (area) of the sample population converted and statistically indicates the acreage of Class I-IV lands converted. The accuracy of the resulting land conversion data generated in the Yamhill study tends to support the efficacy and utility of the monitoring system. The study area has experienced limited conversion (range of 206 - 303 acres annually) in Class I-IV lands, and as expected, the occurrence of sample site conversions is directly influenced by expanding city limits boundaries eliminating high conversion areas from analysis as well as distance from primary urban centers.
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