Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

SurveyWhittakerDouglasP1988Survey.pdf Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/000002372

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  • In response to increasing recreation use, many resource managers have set use limits or carrying capacities in an attempt to protect the quality of experiences. These limits require definitions of quality which involve evaluative information about appropriate use levels or use conditions. Two papers are presented examining different approaches for collecting and analyzing evaluative information, based on data from a 1987 survey of boaters on Oregon's Deschutes River. The first paper examines the utility of the social norm concept for establishing evaluative standards. Results suggest that social norms can be identified for a variety of impacts in a variety of settings, and that there are different identifiable types of norms. A "no tolerance" norm exists when strong majorities of users report that any impact is unacceptable, a "single tolerance" norm exists when users report similar standards at some impact level greater than zero, and a "multiple tolerance" norm exists when there are two or more groups of users with standards at differing impact levels, perhaps reflecting different experience definitions. Norm crystallization, the level of group agreement, is strongest for no tolerance norms and weakest for multiple tolerance norms. The second paper investigates the effects of objective use conditions and comparisons of those conditions with personal standards on perceived crowding. Results support the common research focus upon social interaction or encounters. These impacts are more strongly related to crowding than environmental or resource competition impacts. However, results provide less support for previous research which suggests that crowding is best understood as having both objective and subjective components. In a test of this idea, variables representing comparisons of impact conditions with subjective personal standards explained less of the variance in perceived crowding than variables representing objective conditions alone.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-10-19T18:20:12Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 SurveyWhittakerDouglasP1988Survey.pdf: 178336 bytes, checksum: 14fc94bf0091e04f960b999294592212 (MD5) WhittakerDouglasP1988.pdf: 682770 bytes, checksum: 4f12a447754bc8be5bd4206ae3ba350c (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Joe Nguyen (jnscanner@gmail.com) on 2009-10-15T21:30:44Z No. of bitstreams: 2 SurveyWhittakerDouglasP1988Survey.pdf: 178336 bytes, checksum: 14fc94bf0091e04f960b999294592212 (MD5) WhittakerDouglasP1988.pdf: 682770 bytes, checksum: 4f12a447754bc8be5bd4206ae3ba350c (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-10-19T18:18:22Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 SurveyWhittakerDouglasP1988Survey.pdf: 178336 bytes, checksum: 14fc94bf0091e04f960b999294592212 (MD5) WhittakerDouglasP1988.pdf: 682770 bytes, checksum: 4f12a447754bc8be5bd4206ae3ba350c (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-10-19T18:20:12Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 SurveyWhittakerDouglasP1988Survey.pdf: 178336 bytes, checksum: 14fc94bf0091e04f960b999294592212 (MD5) WhittakerDouglasP1988.pdf: 682770 bytes, checksum: 4f12a447754bc8be5bd4206ae3ba350c (MD5)

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