Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Effects of the aging-related loss in lower extremity strength on the feasible region for balance recovery Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/02871114n

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • A backward fall is a major cause of hip fractures. Hip fractures have the potential to increase the mortality rate of older adults. Thus, the prevention of backward falls by older adults is a critical subject to be studied. Specifically, it remains unknown what effect aging-related losses in muscle strength have on the ability to recover balance by stepping following a backward loss of balance. There were two specific aims in this study. The first aim was to develop two-dimensional musculoskeletal models of young and older adults. The second aim was to quantify the effects of the normal aging-related loss in lower extremity strength on the ability to recover balance following a backward step from a backward balance loss by describing the feasible regions of balance recovery. Two-dimensional musculotendon models of young and older adults were developed and used in a six-link model to simulate backward balance recovery of young and older adults. The feasible regions for young and older adults were described for two combinations of initial backward and downward velocities: 15% body height/s (Bh/s) (condition 1) and 30% Bh/s (condition 2). For condition 1, older adults showed a 25% foot length (fl) more posterior forward boundary at a hip height of 50% Bh and a 12.2% fl more anterior rear boundary at 47.5% Bh than young adults. For condition 2, older adults showed a 6.4% fl more posterior forward boundary at 48.5% Bh and a 12.8% fl more anterior rear boundary at 47.5% Bh than young adults. The feasible regions for young and older adults showed similar ranges of hip height in conditions 1 and 2. The results suggest that older adults are less able than young adults to regain balance after a very short or very long backward step from a backward loss of balance. Thus, the aging-related loss in muscle strength could impair the ability to recover balance during the stance phase after a backward recovery step. However, if a medium step is taken, older adults can show the same ability to recover balance as young adults.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Norio Kadono (kadonon@onid.orst.edu) on 2009-06-18T19:35:41Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Kadono_dissertation.pdf: 725191 bytes, checksum: 79ff146fb2b40e619c395bd8cced33b8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-06-23T15:54:44Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Kadono_dissertation.pdf: 725191 bytes, checksum: 79ff146fb2b40e619c395bd8cced33b8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-06-24T16:04:22Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Kadono_dissertation.pdf: 725191 bytes, checksum: 79ff146fb2b40e619c395bd8cced33b8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-06-24T16:04:22Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Kadono_dissertation.pdf: 725191 bytes, checksum: 79ff146fb2b40e619c395bd8cced33b8 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items