The compared perceptions of a senior high school by teachers and students as measured by the Stern High school Characteristics Index Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/08612s35h

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  • Purpose: This investigation was conducted to determine whether or not teachers and students perceive the environmental press of a secondary school differently, and whether or not teacher groups and student groups vary in their perceptions. Conceptual Framework: "Press" i s a construct which expresses the assumption of elements in the environment which generate forces that are perceived by individuals and which affect their behavior. Press is of two types: Alpha press, which corresponds to the explicit or intended goals of the institution's major participants; and beta press, which corresponds to the implicit or actual goals manifested in the behavior of the major participants. Hypotheses: 1) teachers perceive the school's press differently than do students. 2) teachers' perception of explicit press is a function of various teacher characteristics. These are sex, age, teaching experience, academic preparation, and marital status. 3) students' perceptions of implicit press is a function of various student characteristics. These are grade level, sex, academic achievement, future educational plans, and parents' level of educational attainment. Procedure: The Stern High School Characteristics Index (HSCI) was administered to 270 randomly selected students, and to the entire faculty of 86 teachers in a senior high school in the Pacific Northwest. The assumptions were that 1) teachers' responses to the HSCI items represented their perceptions of explicit press, 2) students' responses represented their perceptions of implicit press. Teacher and student questionnaires identified the independent variables in Hypotheses Two and Three respectively. A 't' test was used for the first Hypothesis in comparing the mean scores of teachers and students on each of the 30 HSCI scales. Analysis of variance was applied to test the second and third Hypotheses. The criterion of significance was the .05 level of confidence. Major Findings: Hypothesis One: Significant differences were found between teachers and students on 17 HSCI scales. These were conjunctivity, deference, ego achievement, energy, harm avoidance, humanities, nurturance, objectivity, reflectiveness, science, sensuality, succorance, understanding, abasement, adaptability, change, and dominance. Teachers obtained higher scores than students on all but the latter four. Hypothesis Two: Perception of explicit press by teachers was found to be a function of sex, age and academic preparation. Differences were found between males and females on eight HSCI scales. Men perceived higher scores than women on all eight. Teachers under 30 years of age differed from those over 29 on seven scales. Teachers who taught subjects conventionally considered academic differed from teachers in non-academic areas on five scales. Hypothesis Three: Perceptions of implicit press by students was found to be a function of grade level, sex, and academic achievement. Differences were found between sophomores, juniors, and seniors on eight HSCI scales. Sophomores received the highest scores on all eight. Differences were found between males and females on nine scales. Females received the highest scores on eight. "A and B" students differed from "C and D" students on five scales. "C and D" students received the highest scores on four. Implications: 1) Secondary teachers perceive the institutional press differently than students within the same environment. 2) Teachers' perception of institutional press is a function of sex, age, and academic preparation. 3) Students' perception of the educational environment is a function of sex, grade level, and academic achievement.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-05-08T19:35:07Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 BuhlAnthonyJoseph1971.pdf: 1306485 bytes, checksum: afa19668084465f9ad619336ee6bc7c3 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1970-06-04
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-08T19:35:07Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 BuhlAnthonyJoseph1971.pdf: 1306485 bytes, checksum: afa19668084465f9ad619336ee6bc7c3 (MD5)

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