Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

A market oriented approach to energy conservation identifying disadvantaged families as target groups for energy assistance programs Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/0g354j09f

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  • Energy expenditures, perceived family well being, and energy conservation actions were analyzed by family composition and level of income. Data were from a three state subsample (Arizona, Colorado, and Oregon; N = 2,633) of a larger stratified random sample of households in the Western United States. Data were collected in the spring of 1981 by mail survey. Self-reported total annual energy expenditures were correlated with scores on an Index of Well Being, a measure of the perceived level of cut-backs in areas of consumption other than energy, due to rising fuel prices. No significant (p ≤ .05) correlation was found between energy expenditures and scores on the Index of Well Being. The proportion of income spent on residential energy (energy budget share), however, was significantly (p = .001) correlated with the Index of Well Being (r = <.247). Families were classified according to the age and marital status of the head of household, and the number of dependents in the family. One-way analysis of variance was used to test differences in energy expenditures, the energy budget share, and scores on the Index of Well Being between family types and families at different income levels. All variables differed significantly (p ≤ .001) between groups. Families past retirement age had an average energy budget share of almost twice the amount of other families. The form of relationship was tested by fitting linear, quadratic, and cubic contrasts to the group means. Energy expenditures varied across stages in the family-life-cycle in the form of an inverted U. Interactions between the two grouping factors, family composition and income, were tested in a two-way analysis of variance. Only in the case of the energy budget share a significant (p ≤ .05) interaction was found. There was no significant effect of climate on energy expenditures. Log-linear analysis was used to find differences in the probability with which families at different stages in the family-life-cycle and at different income levels had taken various energy conservation actions. Models were fitted to five-way frequency tables of energy conservation actions by age and marital status of the head of household, family size, and income. Conservation actions were classified as energy efficiency improvements or curtailments. The probability of efficiency improvements generally increased with age and income, while no clear trend existed for curtailments. A stepwise logistic regression procedure was employed to find socioeconomic and housing factors associated with the differences in conservation actions between family types and income groups. Interfamily differences in energy conservation actions were largely determined by differences in the built environment. The probability for having taken conservation actions was lowest in rented multi-family dwellings, built before 1975. Weatherization programs should, therefore, be targeted to these dwellings. Since loans were equally used by all income groups, but tax credits more often by high income families, a loan program would be a more equitable way to encourage energy conservation than tax credits.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-18T15:02:09Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 MarganusMartin1984.pdf: 1787368 bytes, checksum: 129af598c658359dcf638247f1934077 (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-19T21:07:31Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 MarganusMartin1984.pdf: 1787368 bytes, checksum: 129af598c658359dcf638247f1934077 (MD5)

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