Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Cultural post-adoption services and cigarette smoking for Korean-American transracial adoptees Public Deposited

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  • Over the past several decades, American families have adopted thousands of children from outside of the United States. A large percentage of international adoptions come from South Korea (Selman, 2012). Transracial Korean-American adoptees must navigate circumstances unique to their situations as individuals with a birth culture and an adoptive culture that differ (Lee, 2003). Previous research has investigated outcomes related to psychological adjustment for this population (e.g. Benson, Sharma & Roehlkepartain, 1994; Juffer & van IJzendoorn, 2007), or considered the role that constructive exposure to racial and ethnic experiences serves in the positive psychological development of transracial adoptees (Yoon, 2000). No prior study, however, has evaluated the impact that cultural resources provided by adoption agencies may have on substance usage in adulthood for this population. The present study analyzed self-report responses from adult adoptees to examine an association between adoptee cultural post-adoption service utilization and substance usage represented by smoking in adulthood. In the data utilized for this study, cultural post-adoption resources included accessing cultural and historical information, networking with other adoptees, attending heritage camps, and traveling on heritage tours (Sacerdote, 2007). It was expected that transracial Korean-American adoptees whose families accessed cultural post- adoption services at higher rates would have lower reports of cigarette smoking behavior. A logistic regression model was used to consider the connection between use of cultural services and cigarette smoking. This study points to the potential beneficial effect that cultural post-adoption services may have on reducing activities detrimental to health in transracial Korean-American adoptees, and therefore warrants future consideration and research.
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