Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Basin-scale variation in the spatial pattern of fall movement of juvenile coho salmon in the West Fork Smith River, Oregon Public Deposited

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  • from the summer dry season to the winter wet season. Such movement that connects summer and winter habitats may be particularly important for coho salmon, O. kisutch, because availability of overwintering habitat can limit freshwater survival for this species. Here, I describe basin-scale variability in the spatial pattern of fall movement for juvenile coho salmon between mainstem and tributary streams during the fall of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005. Juvenile coho salmon were tagged with a passive integrated transponder (PIT) and could be detected at five stationary detection sites, two located in perennial tributaries, two in intermittent tributaries, and one in the upper mainstem of the West Fork Smith River, Oregon. For each detection site, I compare the likelihood of detection during the fall by juvenile coho salmon from tagging locations over a multi-kilometer range of distances in each direction away from the tributary confluence. I developed logistic regression models with data from each detection site to estimate: 1) the relative likelihood of immigration into a tributary as compared to emigration out of the tributary, and 2) the relative likelihood of immigration into a tributary from the mainstem downstream of the tributary confluence as compared to immigration from the mainstem upstream of the confluence. For each pair of directions at each detection site, I also compare the change in the likelihood of detection with increasing distance for each direction. Overall, at the two upper-river detection sites, juvenile coho salmon were more likely to emigrate than to immigrate. At the remaining detection sites, juvenile coho salmon were no more likely to emigrate than immigrate. Of these detection sites, fish that immigrated into the mid-river perennial stream were more likely to come from the mainstem downstream of the confluence, whereas fish that immigrated into the two lower-river intermittent tributaries were more likely to come from the mainstem upstream of the confluence. Fall movement of juvenile coho salmon between tributary and mainstem habitat can occur over relatively long distances. This case study demonstrates variation among tributaries in the overall likelihood of emigration and immigration and in the source of immigrants from the mainstem, which may be related to spatial context that combines the physical characteristics and network position of tributary streams. The demonstrated variation in fall movement that connects summer and winter habitat within a stream network is a first step in exploring how complexity in movement interacts with the spatial arrangement and quality of seasonal habitats. More research on the causes of variation in the expression of fall movement will improve our understanding of how the spatial arrangement of habitat within a stream network influences the survival of juvenile coho salmon over the whole freshwater life cycle.
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