Heavy fermion effective mass in the superconducting vortex state Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/0r967721p

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  • The extended-Lifshitz-Kosevitch formalism (ELK) unifies the treatment of the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect, allowing it to transcend its traditional roles of mapping Fermi surfaces and measuring effective masses. Here we exploit the capabilities of dHvA as a probe of many-body effects to examine heavy-fermion su- perconductivity. ELK successfully describes dHvA in heavy fermion materials using a slave-boson model in mean field, and in type-II superconducing materials with the introduction of a self energy due to interactions with the vortex lattice. We propose a model for combining these two many-body effects, and examine its implications for dHvA measurements. The result retains the two important characteristics of its parent models: an enhanced effective mass and temperature-independent damping of the oscillations in the superconducting state. However no suppression of the heavy mass is predicted in the superconducting state, contrary to experiment.
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