Meals Made Easy for Diabetes : evaluation of a diabetes meal planning and nutrition education curriculum Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/0z708z544

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  • The objective of this evaluation was to determine whether the Meals Made Easy for Diabetes curriculum, using the Idaho Plate Method, positively affected participants' fruit, vegetable, and fat intake and their confidence to make appropriate food choices in potentially challenging situations. Adults with a self-reported diagnosis of diabetes (n=132) supplied information on demographic characteristics and answered questions about eating behavior and confidence surrounding potentially challenging food situations both at baseline and after the four-part intervention. The questionnaires included a 7-item fruit and vegetable screener to estimate daily servings of fruits and vegetables, a brief fat screener to estimate percentage of energy from fat, and five questions designed to assess confidence in making appropriate food choices. Change scores for daily servings of fruits and vegetables, percentage of energy from fat, and confidence were calculated by subtracting pre-test scores from post-test scores. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test determined whether participants significantly changed their intake of fruits, vegetables, percentage of energy from fat, or their confidence surrounding dietary behavior issues from the pre-test questionnaire to the post-test questionnaire. Spearman's rho was used to determine whether changes in confidence scores were related to changes in eating behavior. A significant increase of +0.5 daily vegetable servings was reported from baseline to the end of the intervention. Combined fruit and vegetable servings and fruit servings were in the direction of an improvement, but were not statistically significant. Fat as a percentage of caloric intake did not decrease significantly during the intervention. Average confidence scores and scores on each of the individual confidence questions significantly increased from baseline to the end of the intervention, but changes in confidence were not demonstrated to be associated with changes in eating behavior. The intervention appeared to more effectively change participants' confidence in their ability to make appropriate food choices than specific dietary behaviors. The increase in vegetable intake and the trend toward improved fruit and vegetable and fat intake suggest that individuals with diabetes were receptive to the meal planning and nutrition education curriculum.
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