An empirical analysis of educator beliefs related to post-industrial labor reforms in the State of Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/0z709067k

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  • This study examines educator perceptions related to what has been termed New-Union labor reforms. The study provides a review of literature related to teacher Unionization and details a mixed methods analysis of educator beliefs related to three specific labor reforms: (a) alternative salary structures, (b) collaborative, or interest based bargaining processes and, (c) peer review programs related to contract renewal for classroom educators. The study utilized extensive statistical methods to analyze the results of a 36 item survey. Nearly 800 educators across the State of Oregon completed the survey instrument during spring of 2008. Controls for demographics were also employed to better understand sub-group differences and account for variability in response patterns. Additionally, four interviews were conducted with practicing classroom educators to obtain individual perspectives on the labor reforms and to better understand the results of the quantitative analysis. Results revealed that respondents affirmed some components of labor reform, rejected other components of labor reform, and were split on certain features of labor reform. The most reliable finding from the study related to the outcome that educators view standardized achievement tests as subjective. As a result teachers rejected the idea of being paid for student performance. At the same time teachers were open to the possibility of raising wages through other venues of compensation. Additionally, educators endorsed the ideals of collaborative bargaining processes as opposed to industrial or traditional bargaining processes. Finally, Oregon educators did not endorse peer review for contract renewal. Rather, peer review was endorsed for professional development purposes only. Themes of local control were also evident in the response data. A discussion of the quantitative and qualitative results follows the analysis.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2008-12-30T19:23:15Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Final_Dissertation_Upload.pdf: 758900 bytes, checksum: 90ebbd6732f8e20d08bb231551212be1 (MD5)
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