Personality characteristics of selected community college dropouts Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/1831cp36f

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  • The Purpose of the Study The central purpose of this study was to determine if certain personality characteristics differ between community college persisters and those who drop out of school. The following 12 a priori hypotheses involving six Adjective Check List personality scales were tested: 1. Male persisters would have a significant higher mean average than male non-persisters on the Deference (Def) Scale. 2. Female persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female non-persisters on the Deference (Def) Scale. 3. Male persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male non-persisters on the Succorance (SUC) scale. 4. Female persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female non-persisters on the Succorance (SUC) scale. 5. Male persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male non-persisters on the Order (Ord) Scale. 6. Female persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female non-persisters on the Order (Ord) Scale. 7. Male non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male persisters on the Autonomy (Aut) Scale. 8. Female non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female persisters on the Autonomy (Aut) Scale. 9. Male non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male persisters on the Exhibition (Exb) Scale. 10. Female non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female persisters on the Exhibition (Exb) Scale. 11. Male non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than male persisters on the Change (Cha) Scale. 12. Female non-persisters would have a significantly higher mean average than female persisters on the Change (Cha) Scale. Procedures The project was conducted at Mt. Hood Community College, in Gresham, Oregon. One hundred and seventy-three students participated; 49 women persisters and 24 women dropouts, and 63 men persisters and 37 men who dropped out the first four weeks of spring term, 1974. The data were statistically analyzed using the F-test statistic for main effects and a t-value statistic for the subanalysis of data. Selected Findings Each of the 12 a priori hypotheses was rejected as no significant differences occurred between persisters on the following Adjective Check List scales: Order, Exhibition, Autonomy, Change, Succorance, or Deference. However, significant differences did exist on six scales when the enrollment category effect was tested. The male persisters scored significantly higher on the Defensiveness, Personal Adjustment, Intraception, Affiliation, and Number of Favorable Adjectives checked scales. And male and female persisters scored significantly higher than non-persisters on the Total Number of Adjectives Checked scale. Selected Conclusions Although all a priori hypotheses were rejected, there were a number of related findings. For instance, there were more differences between male persisters and non-persisters than female persisters when compared to female non-persisters. Differences between the categories of men occurred six times, while occurring only once among women. Generally speaking, the male dropouts appear to have a less positive self-image than male persisters. However, because personality differences vary so much among dropouts, and between persisters and dropouts, it was concluded that personality tests should not be used to attempt to predict those prone to dropping out, or to generalize that all dropouts exhibit certain unique personality traits or characteristics when compared to persisters. Selected Recommendations Based on the findings and conclusions of this project, it is recommended that additional studies be conducted to examine the conclusions listed above and the implications listed in Chapter V. In addition, it is felt that all Oregon Community Colleges should cooperatively study the dropout problem, and that the exit interview should receive more emphasis at all community colleges.
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