Atomic layer deposition of nanolaminate Al₂O₃-Ta₂O₅ and ZnO-SnO₂ films Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/1j92gc46n

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  • Thin films are an enabling technology for a wide range of applications, from microprocessors to diffusion barriers. Nanolaminate thin films combine two (or more) materials in a layered structure to achieve performance that neither film could provide on its own. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a chemical vapor deposition technique in which film growth occurs through self limiting surface reactions. The atomic scale control of ALD is well suited for producing nanolaminate thin films. In this thesis, ALD of two nanolaminate systems will be investigated: Al₂O₃-Ta₂O₅ and ZnO-SnO₂. Al₂O₃ and Ta₂O₅ are high κ dielectrics that find application as gate oxides for field effect devices such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors and thin film transistors. Al₂O₃-Ta₂O₅ nanolaminate films of a fixed composition and total thickness, but with varied laminate structures, were produced to explore the influence of layer thickness on dielectric behavior. Layer thickness was found to have little impact on the dielectric constant but a strong impact on the leakage current. Thick layered nanolaminates (with 2.5 to 10 nm layers) performed better than either pure material. Showing structure provides a means of tailoring nanolaminate properties. ZnSnO is an amorphous oxide semiconductor used to make transparent TFTs. Although ALD is naturally suited to the production of nanolaminates, the deposition of homogenous ternary compounds is still uncommon. For very thin depositions, nucleation behavior can dominate, resulting in ALD growth rates different than for thicker films. Initial work on ALD of the ZnO-SnO₂ system is presented, focusing on nucleation and growth of each material on the other. It was found that both ZnO and SnO₂ inhibit the growth of one another and a method was developed to characterize the average growth rate for few cycle depositions.
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