Blood, bondage and chains : a legacy of kinship between black-red people Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/2227ms49p

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  • My research is looking at the cultural and kinship ties of African and Native peoples and how our worlds were forged together by colonization, bonded during the institutionalize state of shackles and slavery and how the legacy of these tools of genocide are now tearing us apart. Being of mixed African and Native American heritage, I understand the significant role slavery and its aftermath has had on the identity and family connection of people of mixed African and Native Heritage. The disruption of the family and the destruction of identity are part of the legacy left by the institution of chattel slavery. Persons of mixed Native, African and European heritage are products of intertwined heritages that mark the manifestation of the slavery system and the impact the institution has had on how they choose to identify or are forced to identify. Because of the ingrained racialized practices of the United States, identity for persons of color is decided and based on phenotype characteristics of the individual. For a person of mixed heritage identity, description can be further hindered when their identity is measured and challenged by ethnic and racial standards of the larger White society. These standards and trends work their way into the lives and cultures of the smaller groups to the point that their identities no longer belong to them. As a way to maintain a small degree of control over their families and identities, families passed down oral renderings to each generation. Using a collection of oral histories and personal narrative, this study works to preserve information regarding familial and kinship ties between persons of Native and African American heritage. It examines how slavery, by Native Americans against African Americans, affects kinship ties, identity, and its role in the facilitation or hindrance of the transmission of familial and kinship knowledge of peoples of mixed Native and African American heritage.
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