Human platelet adhesion to heparinized silica surfaces Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/2227ms805

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  • Heparin was modified and immobilized to surface-activated silica surfaces using two different reaction schemes. End-aminated heparin was reacted with 2-iminothiolane to produce free thiol groups at the terminal ends of the heparin chains. The end-thiolated heparin was immobilized by reaction with a pyridyl disulfide activated poly[ethylene oxide]-poly[propylene oxide]-poly[ethylene oxide] triblock copolymer that was non-covalently adsorbed to hydrophobic silica. In addition, heparin was modified with adipic dihydrazide and covalently immobilized to silica treated with of 3-aminopropyl triethoxy-silane and succinic anhydride to favor a side-on-orientation of heparin at the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle analysis were performed at each stage of surface treatment to determine if successful immobilization had taken place. XPS results indicated that successful immobilization of adipic dihydrazide modified heparin had taken place. However, for end-thiolated heparin, XPS results were not entirely consistent with successful heparin immobilization and determination of surface-bound heparin was thus inconclusive. Platelet adhesion under dynamic conditions was investigated on each surface during the immobilization of heparin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize platelet adhesion from human platelet-rich plasma on each surface. The images recorded from SEM were used to determine the number and morphology of adherent platelets. For both heparin immobilization methods, there was a significantly lower number of adherent platelets on heparinized surfaces in comparison to the non-heparinized surfaces. Also, the platelets that did adhere to the heparinized surfaces showed less aggregation and spreading in comparison to the non-heparinized surfaces, which is consistent with a lower extent of platelet activation on these surfaces.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2008-09-08T15:00:23Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Bolsinger_thesis.pdf: 1440886 bytes, checksum: e14161bab8010c9b97a99489ae001e55 (MD5)
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