Cost
 analysis 
of quarantine 
zone 
size 
and control 
policy 
for 
an invasive
 forest 
pathogen
 Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/2227mt66j

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  • Quarantines and control programs are two policy tools used to prevent and reduce the damages caused by invasive species. Quarantines restrict the movement of material that could spread invasive species. Their requirements impose costs on businesses within the quarantine zone by creating barriers to trade and increasing production costs, which indicates that there could be a benefit to reducing the size of quarantine zones to reduce the economic impact of the policy. Using a control policy -- removing some or all of the invasive species – in conjunction with a quarantine zone could reduce the required quarantine zone size. This interaction between prevention (quarantine zones) and control is not addressed in the economics literature, and the tradeoffs associated with quarantine zone size are also understudied. Three conceptual models are developed in this paper to analyze the impact of quarantine zone size on the costs associated with quarantine zone policies, as well as the interaction between quarantine zone size and control. The models are applied to the case of Sudden Oak Death policy in Oregon and its impact on the forest products industry. The analysis finds that, under the assumptions of the case study, the combined policy and control costs over 20 years ranged from $20,448,760 to $75,355,789 depending on the size of the quarantine zone, level of control, and the degree of impact on businesses within the quarantine zone. The application of a transition probability cost minimization framework to the case study reveals an economic incentive to decrease the size of the quarantine zone, even though that change increases the probability that the quarantine zone will need to be expanded later. The application of a deterministic cost minimization framework to the case study shows that the level of control that results in the lowest costs is dependent on the level of impact on businesses within the quarantine zone. The study also demonstrates that the total cost of the pathogen is reduced by the agreement that Oregon has with APHIS, which permits a smaller quarantine zone while there is a control program in place, and without the agreement Oregon might not employ a control policy.
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