Distribution of bioavailable metals and a human health risk assessment from fish and crayfish in the lower Willamette River, Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/2r36v0796

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • In this study the impact of episodic events on levels of bioavailable trace metals Zn, Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb, and As (III) were determined for the lower Willamette River in Oregon. In addition, a comparison among three alternative methods for estuary sampling was conducted. Potential adverse human health risk associated with consuming contaminated fish and crayfish caught in the lower Willamette River was assessed. Data from 2001-2003 suggests that temporal distributions of trace metals in water in the lower Willamette River differed both annually and seasonally. Higher metal concentrations coincided with higher precipitation. Elevated Cu and Pb concentrations during rainy season most likely resulted from municipal/industrial runoff from the Portland Harbor Superfund site and Portland metropolitan area. Elevated Zn levels resulted from industrial and agricultural runoff from upriver locations. The three alternative methods for estuary sampling in this study were: 1) in situ diffusive gel thinflim (DGT) sampling technique with anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) analysis (DGT-ASV); 2) grab water samples with ASV analysis (grab-ASV); and 3) direct aquatic organism sampling (fish/crayfish). The spatial distribution of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in grab- ASV and DGT-ASV were similar to aquatic organism sampling method. The grab-ASV method could often not capture episodic events unlike the more sensitive DGT-ASV method. Common carp, smallmouth bass, and black crappie were collected along river mile (RM) 1 to 108 and analyzed for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn. Signal crayfish collected from RM 1 to 18.5 were analyzed for the same metals. This data was used to assess the potential adverse human health risks associated with consuming fish and crayfish from the lower Willamette River. The average arsenic concentrations in smallmouth bass, black crappie, and common carp from the Portland Harbor and the McCormick & Baxter Superfund site exceeded Oregon Department of Environmental Quality's acceptable cancer-risk level of 1 x 10⁻⁵. The highest risk level of 1.2 x 10⁻⁴ was from arsenic found in black crappie caught from RM 107 to 108. There was no elevated health risk (carcinogenic or non-carcinogenic) from metals associated with eating crayfish caught from the lower Willamette River.
License
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Moochrome, 256 Grayscale) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-02-11T21:18:04Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1KrissanakriangkraiOraphin2005.pdf: 6969782 bytes, checksum: 3e916f1f6d13b98bc804d52ac8d20689 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2011-02-11T21:52:29Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1KrissanakriangkraiOraphin2005.pdf: 6969782 bytes, checksum: 3e916f1f6d13b98bc804d52ac8d20689 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-02-11T21:52:29Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1KrissanakriangkraiOraphin2005.pdf: 6969782 bytes, checksum: 3e916f1f6d13b98bc804d52ac8d20689 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (ecscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2011-02-10T20:57:26ZNo. of bitstreams: 1KrissanakriangkraiOraphin2005.pdf: 6969782 bytes, checksum: 3e916f1f6d13b98bc804d52ac8d20689 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 03/09/2018

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items