Effects of floral position, stamen quality, hand pollination, and temperature during reproductive development on meadowfoam seed set and seed yield Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/2r36v310w

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  • Inconsistent seed yields of meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba Benth.) interfere with profitable production of this new oilseed crop. Significant correlation of field grown meadowfoam seed yields with years having temperatures above 24°C in mid-May at Corvallis, OR., led to the hypothesis that ambient temperature during reproductive development affects meadowfoam seed yields. The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of three day/night temperature regimes (16/10, 24/10, 32/100°C), imposed for seven days during bud, early flowering or peak bloom stages on seed yield, seed number per flower, and seed weight of meadowfoam when grown under a controlled environment. In separate experiments, studies were performed to verify the effectiveness of a hand pollination technique in field-grown meadowfoam; and influences of flower location and stamen quality on seed set in hand-pollinated growth chamber-grown meadowfoam were examined. No significant differences in seed set were found among flowers at different locations on the plants, nor in flowers having normal or abnormal anthers. Supplementally hand-pollinated flowers of field-grown meadowfoam set more seed than bee-pollinated flowers on the same plants. Temperature and floral stage treatments did not result in significant seed number or seed size (1000-seed weight) differences, but high temperature (32°C) imposed at the bud stage did increase seed yield (total weight of all seeds produced per plant). High temperature did not increase seed yield when imposed at early flowering or peak bloom. Temperature during reproductive development does appear to play an important role in determining meadowfoam seed yield, and further research is necessary to determine the extent of seed yield response to temperature in the field.
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