Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

FlemingRonaldA1996.pdf Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/2r36v328b

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • Non-point agricultural contaminants, such as nitrogen, may lower groundwater quality and thereby impose health and environmental risks. The objective of this study is to evaluate tax policies to control agricultural pollutants in a spatially heterogeneous and dynamic setting. The focus of the study is non-point source nitrate contamination of groundwater in Treasure Valley in Malheur County, Oregon. Tax policies to control groundwater nitrates are evaluated utilizing a spatially distributed, dynamic programming model linking the economic and physical processes that determine groundwater quality. Economic and physical processes vary across space and time because of locational (spatial) differences in soil type. Representation of these variations is important when evaluating tax policies. Taxes on unit nitrogen input based on different measures of nitrates (groundwater versus soil water) and at different levels of aggregation (soil zone versus the entire region) are evaluated. The different tax schemes are compared to determine which achieves a standard for nitrate in groundwater at least cost to producers (in terms of lost profit). The tax rate is increased incrementally until predicted (ambient) groundwater nitrate levels at simulated observation well sites meet or exceed a standard for groundwater nitrates. An important implication from this study is the need to base groundwater regulatory policies on ambient groundwater quality and not an intermediate quality indicator, such as soil water quality. A regulatory policy based on soil water quality is inferior relative to a policy based on ambient groundwater quality. Additionally, a spatial tax achieves the standard for groundwater nitrates at a lower cost to producers than a uniform tax, however, the benefits received by utilizing a spatial tax are probably not sufficient to cover the added costs of such a tax. All tax policies require substantial change in agricultural practices at a large cost to producers in the study region. This would call into question the political feasibility of such policies. While tax policies were the focus of this investigation, an analysis of nitrogen input restrictions indicates that other control policies and new technologies may achieve the standard for groundwater nitrates at least cost to producers in the study area.
Rights Statement
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2010-10-12T15:19:16Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 FlemingRonaldA1996.pdf: 1698316 bytes, checksum: e83b6ab7fe6c2ae29f1f1aa7b337c2f1 (MD5) Fleming, Ronald A.zip: 71522 bytes, checksum: 2332915acd707acfc53fb502015760bc (MD5)
  • Digital files may be obsolete and unable to be opened with current technology.
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2010-10-11T19:36:30Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 FlemingRonaldA1996.pdf: 1698316 bytes, checksum: e83b6ab7fe6c2ae29f1f1aa7b337c2f1 (MD5) Fleming, Ronald A.zip: 71522 bytes, checksum: 2332915acd707acfc53fb502015760bc (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2010-10-12T15:19:16Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 FlemingRonaldA1996.pdf: 1698316 bytes, checksum: e83b6ab7fe6c2ae29f1f1aa7b337c2f1 (MD5) Fleming, Ronald A.zip: 71522 bytes, checksum: 2332915acd707acfc53fb502015760bc (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Eric Hepler (ehscanner@gmail.com) on 2010-10-08T23:02:00Z No. of bitstreams: 2 FlemingRonaldA1996.pdf: 1698316 bytes, checksum: e83b6ab7fe6c2ae29f1f1aa7b337c2f1 (MD5) Fleming, Ronald A.zip: 71522 bytes, checksum: 2332915acd707acfc53fb502015760bc (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

Items