Teachers' beliefs and willingness to be involved with certain aspects of Oregon home economics education curriculum Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/2z10ws67q

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  • The purpose of this study was designed to answer 1. What are the beliefs and attitudes that Oregon home economics teachers hold about various new trends? 2. Are Oregon home economics teachers willing to support the various new trends? 3. Are Oregon home economics teachers willing to further prepare themselves to work with the trends? 4. Are Oregon home economics teachers willing to accept teaching responsibilities for the trends? 5. Are Oregon home economics teachers willing to assume leadership responsibilities for the trends? The six trends included in the study were related to programs for 1. The handicapped 2. The socio-economically disadvantaged 3. Occupational education 4. Coeducational classes 5. Specialized semester courses 6. Family life courses A questionnaire was constructed, validated, and sent to 394 home economics teachers in the State of Oregon to gain answers to the five questions as they related to the six trends. Of the questionnaires mailed out, 241 were returned and 160 (41 percent) were usable. Nearly one half of the respondents were 40 years of age or older. Approximately two thirds were married. Nearly 70 percent received their bachelor's degrees since 1940. Fewer than 15 percent of the respondents had master's degrees and over 80 percent of these were received since 1960. About one half of the teachers had taken from 1-42 quarter hours beyond their last degree. At least one half of the respondents had had six or fewer years teaching experience and some experience in teaching other subject matter areas. Most (two thirds) taught in senior high schools where enrollments of more than one half of the schools were less than 1,000. Nearly one half of the respondents did not indicate that boys were a part of their program. Analysis of data showed that the respondents held quite positive beliefs concerning each of the six trends. For every trend, except programs for the handicapped, at least 70 percent felt that the home economics education programs were very important or moderately important. Fewer than five percent had negative feelings about any of the trends excepting programs for the handicapped and occupational education where 30 percent and 12 percent of the replies were negative and most often showed the feeling that respondents felt other groups were better qualified. The respondents showed a general willingness to support the trends with at least three fourths giving positive replies for every trend except programs for the handicapped and coeducational classes. The majority of the positive responses showed that the respondents were most interested in indirect types of support rather than active support. Negative replies most often showed that respondents believed other programs were more important, that they did not have time to support the trend, or that there was no need for the program in their community. Over one half of the respondents were willing to further prepare themselves for involvement in the six trends and were most interested in family life courses, occupational education and programs for the socio-economically disadvantaged. Special workshops was most often indicated as the preferred method of preparation. Negative replies showed that respondents were more interested in other areas or were already prepared. At least 80 percent of the respondents were willing to assume teaching responsibilities for every trend except occupational education and programs for the handicapped. Respondents often said they would teach in these trends only if they were given special preparation or if they were given time to prepare. Replies in the negative category most often indicated that the respondents were already involved or were more interested in other areas. Although nearly 70 percent of the respondents would assume leadership roles for family life, specialized semester, and coeducational classes, fewer than one half would take on this responsibility for occupational education and programs for the socio- economically disadvantaged and fewer than one fourth would lead programs for the handicapped. Respondents who replied negatively felt that they did not have the background or did not have the time or interest. The following conclusions were reached. 1. The majority of the respondents held favorable attitudes about the six trends. 2. Programs for the handicapped, the socio- economically disadvantaged, and occupational education followed similar patterns of acceptance and of respondents' willingness to be involved, while coeducational classes, specialized semester courses, family life courses were more accepted than the first three trends.
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