Relationship between fashion leadership and apparel buying behavior among Oregon women Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/3r0750284

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  • Researchers have investigated the behavioral and demographic characteristics of fashion innovators, opinion leaders, and innovative communicators in samples drawn from populations residing outside of Oregon. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine differences between innovative communicators and non-innovative communicators in a sample of Oregon women in their shopping behavior and demographic characteristics. This study was conducted in order to compare these two segments of Oregon women with samples drawn from other populations. The first objective of the study was to examine what retail outlets were patronized for apparel purchases, what form of payment was used for clothing purchases, and how much money was spent annually on these purchases by Oregon women. A second objective was to develop shopping behavior profiles of Oregon women who were categorized as innovative communicators and non-innovative communicators. Diffusion theory was used to explain the adoption process by consumers when adopting innovations. On the basis of their level of innovativeness, Rogers (1983) categorized individuals into one of five adopter categories: innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards. Innovators were found to be the first in a social group to adopt an innovation, whereas early adopters were opinion leaders of innovations. Although functionally different, similarities were found in the demographic and life-style chararacteristics of innovators and opinion leaders. The term "innovative communicator" was used to identify individuals who simultaneously performed the role of innovator and opinion leader (Baumgarten, 1975). Life-style research examined consumer characteristics of innovative communicators and non-innovative communicators in relation to their shopping behavior. Based on diffusion and life-style literature, a number of hypotheses were developed that examined store patronage, form of payment, annual amount spent on apparel purchases, and demographic characteristics in relation to level of fashion leadership. Data used for this study were taken from a larger study, Agriculture Experiment Station Western Region Project W- 175, that was conducted in 1987. From this questionnaire, items that asked about retail store patronage, clothing expenditures, fashion leadership, and demographic characteristics were used for the present study. The sample consisted of 234 adult Oregon women. Subjects were classified as innovative-communicators, medium innovative communicators, or non-innovative communicators based on summed scores from the fashion innovativeness and fashion opinion leadership items from the questionnaire. For statistical analysis, one-way analysis of variance, post-hoc analysis using the Tukey HSD test, and chi-square were performed. The .05 confidence level was selected for claims of statistical significance. Profiles of Oregon women classified as innovative communicators and non-innovative communicators emerged relating to their shopping behavior and demographic characteristics. Women in Oregon who categorized themselves as innovative communicators had a higher household income, spent more money on apparel, always or often purchased their apparel at specialty stores, and sometimes purchased apparel at department stores. Oregon women who categorized themselves as non-innovative communicators had lower household incomes, spent less money on apparel, always or often purchased their apparel at discount stores, and sometimes purchased apparel at department stores. In terms of shopping behavior and demographic characteristics, similarities were found between this sample of innovative communicators and non-innovative communicators and samples previously studied. Innovative communicators and non-innovative communicators among Oregon women were found to be similar to samples previously studied with regard to store patronage, clothing expenditures, and level of income. Innovative communicators and non-innovative communicators in the present sample were also similar to samples previously studied in their use of store credit cards for apparel purchases. Because of these similarities, results on profiles of innovative communicators and non-innovative communicators can be used by retailers in developing marketing strategies to fit their retail establishments.
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  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-06-25T23:12:54Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 JohnsonCherylCruzan1990.pdf: 1894603 bytes, checksum: 2f1e379c669cc4d7fc48b343b7a34079 (MD5)
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