Self concepts of gainfully employed women in two colleges in Washington State Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/3x816r14v

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  • Purpose The purpose of this study was two fold: 1) to determine the self concepts of women workers and their relationship to certain personal variables and patterns of work, and 2) to produce basic self concept research. Procedures The subjects selected for this study were the women employed in 1973 at Eastern Washington State College and Central Washington State College. Eastern employed 302 women and Central employed 282 women for a total of 583 subjects. The women worked at a variety of occupations in two different work settings. The women's occupations fell into three major divisions; professional, clerical and service workers. Each student was sent a data gathering packet that consisted of a cover letter, personal data sheet, instruction sheet, Tennessee Self Concept Scale booklet, score sheet and self-addressed-stamped envelope. Of the packets distributed, 378 were useable. The data from the personal data sheets were put on code sheets. The TSCS was mailed to Counselor Recordings and Tests, Nashville, Tennessee for scoring. When the computer print-outs were returned to the researcher, the T scores were matched with the personal data information. The data were then processed by programmed computer to determine if there were significant differences in the marital status, job classification, total length of time worked, length of time held in present position, age and education of the women workers. The data were then processed by programmed calculator and mean scores, as well as the one-way analysis of variance, were determined. Conclusions The statistical findings of this research project offers the following conclusions: 1. Marriage makes a significant difference in the self concepts of the group of working women studied. Married women had the highest self concept scores. Single women had the lowest scores. Divorced or separated women had scores higher than single women. Marriage, even if it was unsuccessful, produced higher self concept scores among the group of women studied. 2. The length of time a woman worked at her present position was directly related to her self concept score. The longer she worked, the more likely her score on the TSCS would be higher. 3. The TSCS mean scores in all the categories, under each hypothesis, showed that the respondents were above the norm of 50. This showed that the group had a positive self concept. Implications In view of the findings and conclusions of this study, the following implications were drawn: 1. Marital status was the most influential factor in forming self concepts of the women studied. Schools and other social institutions would help strengthen the self concepts of all women by encouraging women to think of themselves as individually valuable married or not married. 2. The longer a woman held her present position the better her self concept became. This knowledge would be valuable to all women, as well as employers. It would mean that women who worked in the same position over a long period of time would have the confidence needed for upward job mobility. Persons with a high self concept handle stress better and that would make them more qualified for advancement.
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