Effects of DDE and DDT on the performance of coturnix quail Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/47429d01m

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  • Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of p, p'-DDE and p, 'Dr-DDT on the performance of Coturnix quail (Co-. turnix coturnix japonica) fed an adequate and deficient calcium diet. In Experiment I four hundred day-old Coturnix quail of mixed sex were fed 0 and 50 ppm of p, p'-DDE on a soybean meal-glucose monohydrate diet to 2 weeks of age. Thereafter the dosage was increased to 100 ppm on a corn-soybean meal diet. At the beginning of 25 percent egg production (10 wks. ) the two populations were subdivided so that the pesticide treatments were reversed for one-half each population. The resulting four populations were further subdivided to receive diets containing 0.5 or 3. 0 percent calcium and treatments were duplicated with 12 females per pen. The males were separated from the females, housed 20 birds per pen in duplicate lots and fed the lower calcium level. In the second experiment two hundred day-old quail of mixed sex were distributed randomly into four groups of 50 each and fed the same breeder-type diet which contained either 0, 100, or 300 ppm of p, p' -DDE or 100 ppm of p, p' -DDT. Sexually mature males were housed with females at a ratio of 1:1. At 25 percent egg production each group was subdivided so that half received diets with either 3.0 or 0. 5 percent calcium and the resulting eight treatments were duplicated with 12 birds per pen. The quail through eight 28-day production periods in Experiment I seemed unaffected by the DDE intake during the developing period. Egg shell thickness, as indicated by specific gravity, and number of cracked eggs were not influenced by pesticide treatment in either experiment. Eggs from quail fed the lower calcium level showed markedly thinner shells and more cracks, however, there were no pesticide X calcium interactions. Egg production, feed consumption, egg weight and female body weight were not significantly affected by the pesticide treatments. Female mortality was higher with 3 percent calcium (associated with prolapse), and with the higher pesticide treatments. Males seemed more sensitive to DDE toxicity than females and experienced greater mortality which was accompanied by a gradual loss of body weight along with decreased fertilizing capacity. Hatchability of fertile eggs and livability of chicks were not significantly affected by the pesticide treatments, however hatchability was reduced on the lower calcium diet.
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