Seedling survival, mycorrhiza development and rhizosphere biology of Pseudotsuga menziesii seedlings outplanted on a degraded forest site in southwestern Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/47429f26p

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  • Inoculation of planting holes with small amounts of soil from a mature forest and a plantation improved survival and growth of Pseudotsuga menziesii seedlings in a degraded clear-cut in southwestern Oregon. To determine the component(s) of the transferred soil responsible for survival and growth increases, we treated forest, plantation and clear-cut soil with fertilizer to test for a nutrient effect, with dimethoate and carbofuran to test for microarthropod or nematode effects, with fumagillin to test for protozoa effects, with captan to test for fungal effects, with penicillin and oxytetracycline to test for bacterial effects, with pasteurization to test for effects of active forms of organisms, with tyndallization to test for effects of resting forms of organisms, and with water as controls. All biocides significantly reduced the populations of target organisms in the transfer soils, except dimethoate-carbofuran which failed to reduce numbers of microarthropods. All biocides also affected some populations of non-target organisms. Inoculation with tyndallized, pasteurized and captantreated soils increased seedling growth and survival. Inoculation with untreated forest or plantation soils failed to increase diversity of rnycorrhizal types, although they increased numbers of mycorrhizae. Soil transfers with significant effects on seedling rhizospheres increased the number of Rhizopogon and Thelephora mycorrhizae and decreased the number of active bacteria. It is hypothesized that the role of the transfered soil is not to supply a missing key organism from the soil ecosystem, but to provide a safe site for some organisms, already present in the clear-cut or brought in along with the seedlings, to proliferate in an enivironment free from the influence of a deleterious organism sensitive to heat and captan present in the clear-cut soil. Alternative hypotheses are discussed.
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